Travel Phrasal Verbs and Common English Expressions

Travel Phrasal Verbs and Common English Expressions

Enjoy a funny English story and learn lots of phrasal verbs and expressions for traveling while you watch.
Here are some of the phrasal verbs and expressions you’ll see in action: stop by, stop off, pick someone up, drop someone off, give someone a ride/lift, touch down, check in, set off, hurry up and take off.

Click here to learn more phrasal verbs for: computers and technology, food and eating, organizing things.
Click here to learn phrases for checking in at an airport.
Click here to learn how to use the words: travel, trip and journey.

Phrasal Verbs and Common Expressions for Talking about Traveling

The best way to learn English phrasal verbs is to see them in action. So today, we’re going to show you lots of phrasal verbs in a story, a funny story. You’ll love it.
We’re looking at phrasal verbs to do with travelling, so verbs to do with travel, trips, and journeys. Do you know how to use these words? If you’re not sure, don’t worry. We’ve made another video about them that you can see here. We make a new lessons every week at Simple English Videos, so make sure you subscribe to our channel and click the notification bell. That way you’ll know when there’s a new video waiting for you.
But this lesson’s about phrasal verbs we use to talk about travelling. Your task is to watch a story, enjoy it, and see how many phrasal verbs you can spot. When it’s finished we’ll check your answers and explain what all the verbs mean. Ready?

I’ve got an important job for you Jay.
Yeah?
Mrs. Clarkson’s stopping by today.
Mrs. Clarkson of Clarkson Industries?
Yes.
She’s coming here?
Yes. She’s flying to Chicago and she’s stopping off to see us on the way.
Wow!
I need you pick her up at the airport and bring her to the office.
Great!
Her plane gets in at three. She only has a couple of hours between flights.
Don’t worry. When her plane touches down, I’ll be there waiting.
Good.
Oh no!
What?
I don’t have my car with me today. Vicki gave me a ride to work.
Argh! You can use my car.
Your new Volvo?
Yes, but be very careful.
I will. Thank you, Kathy.
Whose car key is this?
Oh, it’s Kathy’s
The key to her new Volvo?
Yes, I’m going to pick up an important customer at the airport.
It’s got wi-fi and all kinds of gadgets.
I know.
How fast can it go?
Oh, I have no idea.
I’ll find out.
But I have to be at the airport at three.
I’ll be back in ten minutes. I’ll bring you some doughnuts.
Kathy will kill me if I’m late. Oh, hurry up Vicki. Where have you been?
Out and about.
Give me the key.
Jay. Why weren’t you at the airport?
I’m setting off now, Kathy.
You’re too late. Mrs. Clarkson just checked in for her next flight.
I can be there ten minutes.
She’s getting on the plane now.
But it’s not my fault. Vicki took your car key and then she took off.
Jay wanted me to get him some doughnuts. Would you like one?
Jay! In my office. Now!

Let’s look at some of the phrasal verbs you heard. The first two were stop by and stop off.

Mrs Clarkson’s stopping by today.
Mrs Clarkson of Clarkson Industries?
Yes.
She’s coming here?
Yes. She’s flying to Chicago and she’s stopping off to see us on the way
Wow!

Stop by and stop off have very similar meanings. If you stop by a place you make a short visit there. Stop off is very similar, but it’s a short visit during a journey, so when you’re going to a place you might stop off somewhere else on the way.
OK, the next verb you heard was pick up.

I need you pick her up at the airport and bring her to the office.
Great!

Pick someone up means going to a place to collect them. So we might go to an airport in our car to collect someone who will be waiting for us. We can pick up things too – collect them when they’re ready.
The opposite of picking up is dropping off. That’s when you take someone to a place by car, and then you leave them there. So maybe you’re on your way somewhere and your route takes you past a place that the other person needs to be. You drop them off.
OK, the next two verbs we heard were get in and touch down.

Her plane gets in at three. She only has a couple of hours between flights.
Don’t worry. When her plane touches down, I’ll be there waiting.
Good.

Get in is a really useful verb. It means to arrive at a place. When you want to know what time someone’s plane, train or bus is arriving you can say, when does it get in?
Touch down is specific to planes and it’s the action of landing. When a plane makes contact with the ground it touches down. Great. Next one.

Oh no!
What?
I don’t have my car with me today. Vicki gave me a ride to work.
Argh! You can use my car.
Your new Volvo?
Yes, but be very careful.
I will.

To give someone a ride is American English expression and it means to take someone somewhere in your car. In British English we’d say give someone a lift. It means the same thing. It’s a free ride to a place they want to get to.
OK, the next phrasal verb you heard wasn’t specifically about travel, but it’s very useful. See if you can spot it.

How fast can it go?
Oh, I have no idea.
I’ll find out.
But I have to be at the airport at three.

It was find out. To find out means to discover – to get information about something.
The next phrasal verb was easy.

Kathy will kill me if I’m late. Oh hurry up Vicki.

Say ‘hurry up’ when you want someone to do something faster. It means do something quickly because there isn’t much time.
OK. The next two….

Jay. Why weren’t you at the airport?
I’m setting off now, Kathy.
You’re too late. Mrs. Clarkson just checked in for her next flight.

To set off – this means to begin a journey, so to start to go somewhere.
And to ‘check in’ means to register. When you go to an airport or a hotel, you go to a desk to tell them that you’ve arrived.
We’ve made another video with useful phrases for checking in at an airport. Click here to see it.

OK, just two more verbs.
I can be there ten minutes.
She’s getting on the plane now.
But it’s not my fault. Vicki took your car key and then she took off.

When we get on a plane, we board the plane. We get inside it. And then the plane takes off. It rises into the air. Planes and rockets take off. Now that’s one meaning of take off but there’s another one. Take off can also mean to leave somewhere in a hurry. If someone disappears quickly, we can say they took off – it means they left suddenly.
And that’s all the phrasal verbs you heard. Phew! There were a lot. Let’s watch the story again, and this time you can see the words.

I’ve got an important job for you Jay.
Yeah?
Mrs. Clarkson’s stopping by today.
Mrs. Clarkson of Clarkson Industries?
Yes.
She’s coming here.
Yes. She’s flying to Chicago and she’s stopping off to see us on the way
Wow!
I need you pick her up at the airport and bring her to the office.
Great!
Her plane gets in at three. She only has a couple of hours between flights.
Don’t worry. When her plane touches down, I’ll be there waiting.
Good.
Oh no!
What?
I don’t have my car with me today. Vicki gave me a ride to work.
Argh! You can use my car.
Your new Volvo?
Yes, but be very careful.
I will. Thank you, Kathy.
Whose car key is this?
Oh, it’s Kathy’s.
The key to her new Volvo?
Yes, I’m going to pick up an important customer up at the airport.
It’s got wifi and all kinds of gadgets.
I know.
How fast can it go?
Oh, I have no idea.
I’ll find out.
But I have to be at the airport at three.
I’ll be back in ten minutes. I’ll bring you some doughnuts.
Kathy will kill me if I’m late. Oh hurry up Vicki. Where have you been?
Out and about.
Give me the key.
Jay. Why weren’t you at the airport?
I’m setting off now, Kathy.
You’re too late. Mrs Clarkson just checked in for her next flight.
I can be there ten minutes.
She’s getting on the plane now.
But it’s not my fault. Vicki took your car key and then she took off.
Jay wanted me to get him some doughnuts. Would you like one?
Jay, in my office. Now!

If you enjoyed this story and you like this way of learning, please share this video with a friend who’s also learning English. See you next Friday. Bye!
Click here to learn more phrasal verbs for: computers and technology, food and eating, organizing things.
Click here to learn phrases for checking in at an airport.
Click here to learn how to use the words: travel, trip and journey.

Meghan, Harry and the Royal Wedding. What do Americans think?

Meghan, Harry and the Royal Wedding. What do Americans think?

Are American’s excited about the royal wedding? After all, it’s a British event.
Watch this video to find out what American’s think of Meghan and Prince Harry and to learn lots of great English expressions. This is a listening practice lesson with fast, natural English.

Click here to see videos about British and American English differences.
Click here to learn the difference between interesting and interested.

Meghan, Prince Harry and the royal wedding

Hi. I’m Vicki and I’m British but I live in the United States.
And I’m Jay, Vicki’s husband, and I’m American.
There’s been a lot of news on the television here about the British royal wedding.
And you’re surprised?
Yes, because it’s a British event.
We’ve got some great listening practice for you today.
You’re going to hear lots of fast natural English.
And learn some great English expressions too. Are you ready?

What do you think of the royal wedding?
Have to watch it.
I think it’s going to be a very exciting event. Looking forward to it.
I think it’s great.
Do you think they show it too much on American television?
No, not at all.
Actually I’m very excited about the new royal baby. Super cute.
I’m super excited. I remember the last Royal wedding. I was in like seventh grade and we were watching it on TV so I am excited for this one. I am in love with Meghan Markle so…
Have you heard of the queen?
Yes.
What do you know about the queen?
Erm… Her name is Elizabeth. I think she wears a dress and a crown.
And a crown, of course. Excellent!
Do you think you’re going to watch the wedding?
If it’s at a time that makes sense for me, then I would like to. I don’t know if I’ll be able to, but I want to.
Will you be watching it?
Probably not live, because isn’t it going to be like four o’clock in the morning my time?
Maybe. It’s possible, or I might just catch it on YouTube.
My sister and cousin and I got up at something ungodly like 4.30 AM in California for Princess Di’s wedding and we’re all going to try to meet and recreate the whole thing…
Fantastic!
Whatever hour it’s on.
We’d like your prediction. Is this marriage going to be successful and happy?
Yes, because he’s not listening to the naysayers. He’s following his heart and Meghan’s awesome, so I think yes.
I feel like she’s going to spice it up. Like she’s going to spice up the royal family, like kind of bring some flair to, you know, everything.
I think they could probably do with that.
Yeah, I think they could use her. Yeah.
Who’s your favourite royal?
Ahhh. You know I have to give it to the queen, because she’s the queen.
I, of course, years ago, wanted to marry Prince Andrew. We all did.
Tell me, who is your favourite royal?
Oooo. Elizabeth. Elizabeth. She’s so argh! She’s so sassy. I love her.
I’ve gotta say the queen. Love her outfits. Love the hats.
Do you think America should have a queen?
I mean, we do. Beyonce. Duh!

They were great.
And they used lots of interesting expressions. Have a look at these, Jay. What’s missing?
Hmmm. I.. and I’m… If we were writing it, we’d write I and I’m.

What do you think of the Royal wedding?
Have to watch it.
I think it’s going to be a very exciting event. Looking forward to it.

When we’re speaking fast or informally, sometimes we don’t say the subject.
We understand the meaning without it.
Another interesting thing. What’s the difference between excited and exciting?
I know this one. Excited describes how you feel and exciting describes the thing that caused the feeling.
Yeah. This is worth learning because the same thing happens with lots of other adjectives.
Like interesting and interested, surprising and surprised, …
Amazing and amazed… They follow the same pattern.

I think it’s going to be a very exciting event.
I’m super excited.

We could say this in British English but usually we say very excited or really excited.
We say that too, but if we’re very, very excited, we’re super excited. They were super excited for the wedding.
Ah that’s something else. You can be excited for something in American English.
Yes, can’t you?
No we get excited ABOUT something in British English.
We can say that too.

I remember the last Royal wedding, I was in like seventh grade and we were watching it on TV so I am excited for this one.
Actually I’m very excited about the new royal baby. Super cute.
So super cute is very, very cute.

Yes. We met someone who was super cute.
Yes!

Erm… Her name is Elizabeth. I think she wears a dress and a crown.

This is a crown.
Very nice. Now there’s a time difference between the UK and the US, so the wedding might be early in the morning here.
Will you be watching it?
Probably not live, because isn’t it going to be like four in the morning my time?
Maybe. It’s possible, or I might just catch it on YouTube.

If we watch something live, we watch it in real time – the time it’s happening.
And if we catch something, like a TV program or show, we see or hear it.
Yes, like ‘Do you want to catch a movie later?’
It’s informal and it’s more common in American than British English.

My sister and cousin and I got up at something ungodly like 4.30 AM in California for Princess Di’s wedding and we’re all going to try to meet and recreate the whole thing… whatever hour it’s on.

She was a real fan.
Yes and notice the word ‘ungodly’.
An ungodly hour and means super-early.
Or very very late. It’s an unreasonable time.
An annoying time.
Yeah. OK, next one. What do you think naysayers means?

We’d like your prediction. Is this marriage going to be successful and happy?
Yes, because he’s not listening to the naysayers. He’s following his heart and Meghan’s awesome, so I think yes.

Nay is an old-fashioned word for no.
And a naysayer is a very negative person.
They always give you reasons for why things won’t work.
We don’t like naysayers.
We like people who are positive and optimistic. And people who spice things up.

I feel like she’s going to spice it up. Like she’s gonna spice up the royal family, like kind of bring some flair to, you know, everything.

Spices are powders and seeds that we use in cooking.
If we spice up food we give it a strong taste and smell.
But we can spice up other things too. It means make them more interesting and exciting
What about flair?
If you have flair then you do things in an interesting way.
With imagination.
Yeah. OK, next one.

Tell me, who is your favourite royal?
Oooo. Elizabeth. Elizabeth. She’s so… argh! She’s so sassy. I love her.
I’ve gotta say the queen. Love her outfits. Love the hats.

Sassy is a lovely word. It means she doesn’t care what people think.
It means she’s fashionable and confident.
Sassy is an American word. I think we’d understand it but we don’t say it much in British English.
Really? What would you say then?
Maybe feisty?
Sassy can also have a negative meaning. If a child is rude and doesn’t show respect, they can be sassy.
So if you tell a child to do something and they answer back?
Then they’re sassy. What would you say in British English?
Cheeky. It means rude and disrespectful, but often in a funny way.
You know, I think it’s going to be hard for Meghan being married to a Brit.
Why?
Because you sound funny.
You cheeky devil!
OK, the last one.

Do you think America should have a queen?
I mean, we do. Beyonce. Duh!

Duh! This is another American word that I love.
We say it when someone says something stupid.
And often in a joking way. Like here.
Yeah. Obviously Beyonce is America’s queen. Duh!
And that’s it everyone.
We want to say a big thank you to everyone who appeared in this video.
Yes, you were great.
If you’ve enjoyed this video, please share it with a friend and hit that subscribe button.
See you next Friday everyone. Bye.
Bye-bye.
Click here to see videos about British and American English differences.
Click here to learn the difference between interesting and interested.

Too and enough – how to use these useful English words

Too and enough – how to use these useful English words

We hope you have enough time to watch this video!
Too and enough are really useful words that you can use with nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs.
In this video you’ll learn how enough means sufficient and not enough means needing more. Too many and too much mean more than sufficient or more than is necessary.
You’ll also learn about word order. We use too before adjectives and adverbs and enough after them.

Click here to see more grammar videos.
Click here to learn how to use the words hard and hardly.

Too and enough

You’re not getting enough sleep.
Yes, I think I’m working too hard.
I think you go to bed too late.

These are two very common and very useful words. Let’s start with enough.

Oh good. You got some bottled water.
Is it enough?
Yes, plenty.
Good.

We use ‘enough’ to say we have as much or as many as we need or want, so a sufficient quantity.

Oh, I’m almost out of gas.
Do you have enough to get to a petrol station?
A petrol station?
A gas station.

If we don’t have enough, we don’t have the amount we need.

Do you want to come for lunch?
I can’t. I don’t have enough time.
Ah, too busy, eh?
Yeah.

So enough means having the necessary amount of something. Now, what about too?

Spaghetti.
Oh, that’s too much.
Let’s have some chocolates.
Ooo yes. But not too many.
You can never have too many chocolates.

We use ‘too’ to say more than sufficient, more than necessary, or more than is good.

This bag’s too big for carry on.
Well, yes.
You’re not getting enough sleep.
Yes. I think I’m working too hard.
I think you go to bed too late.

Notice the word position. We use ‘too’ before adjectives and adverbs but we use ‘enough’ after them.
So too comes before.
Enough comes after.

This lid is too tight. I’m not strong enough.
This knife’s too blunt. It’s not sharp enough.
This lid is too tight. I’m not strong enough.
This knife’s too blunt. It’s not sharp enough. Try this.

So that’s how to use too and enough. I hope this lesson wasn’t too difficult. Was it easy enough?
If you’ve enjoyed it, please share this video with a friend. At Simple English Videos we believe you can learn faster if you can see English in action, so we have lots of conversations, that show you what people say in the real world. We publish a new video every Friday, so subscribe to our channel for more! Bye now!

Click here to see more grammar videos.
Click here to learn how to use the words hard and hardly.

Hope and Wish Part Two – Past situations

Hope and Wish Part Two – Past situations

Learn the different meanings and grammar of the English verbs ‘hope’ and ‘wish’ in this video lesson. This is an important lesson if you’re talking an English exam like IELTS, Cambridge First Certificate or TOEFL. They often have questions on these verbs because the grammar is tricky.
You’ll see lots of examples in action and get clear explanations in this video lesson. This is the second part of a two-part lesson on these verbs. In part one you learnt how we use them to talk about present situations. In part two you’ll learn about past situations.

Click here to see part one on how we use hope and wish to talk about present situations.
Click here to find out how we use wish and hope to give good wishes to someone.
Click here to find out how we use hope, wait, expect and look forward to to talk about the future.

Hope vs Wish – past situations

If you’re taking a Cambridge exam like IELTS or First Certificate, or if you’re taking TOEFL, this is an important lesson because they often set questions about these verbs. I think they do it because the grammar’s tricky. So let’s work on it and take your English up a level.
This is the second part of our video on wish and hope. In part one, we looked at how we use these verbs to talk about present situations. If you haven’t seen it, you might want to watch that video before you watch this one.
In this video we’re going to look at how we talk about hopes and wishes in the past.
Let’s start with hope.

How’s it going?
Oh OK. But I’ve got so much to do.
Do you want a hand?
Oh thank you. I hoped he’d say that.

So before Jay arrived, I was thinking ‘I hope Jay can help me’.
And I’m talking about a hope I had in the past here. Notice I said ‘would’. So the past tense of hope and then ‘would’.
We often use the contracted form of ‘would’, so it can be difficult to spot.
In this example, we have the simple past form of hope, but we can use other past forms. Let’s see some.

This is our dog Carter.
We adopted him six years ago. Now he’s eight years old now and he’s a wonderful dog.
He drives me crazy because he barks a lot when people come to the door.
He does get a little excited.
We were hoping he’d calm down as he got older.
And that’s what happened.
No, it didn’t.
Yes, it did.
He still goes crazy when the postman comes.
Yeah. We had hoped that he’d stop barking at the mailman, but that didn’t happen. Well, he doesn’t like the mailman. Do you?

So in the past we thought it was possible that Carter would calm down as he got older. Jay thinks he has calmed down, but I don’t.
I said ‘we were hoping he’d calm down’. I could also say ‘we hoped he’d calm down’. That works too.
And you heard another past form of hope.

He still goes crazy when the postman comes.
Yeah. We had hoped that he’d stop barking at the mailman, but that didn’t happen.

We used the past perfect – had hoped. The past perfect indicates that this action didn’t happen. Carter still barks at the mail man.
If we say ‘hoped’ or was ‘hoping’, the action might have happened or might not. It’s not specific.
But if we say ‘had hoped’, it means the action didn’t happen.
So use these structures to talk about past hopes. And if you want to make it clear that an action didn’t happen, use the past perfect.
That’s the verb ‘hope’, but what about ‘wish’? We use ‘wish’ to talk about imaginary situations – improbable or impossible things. Let’s see how that works in the past.

You’re in a good mood.
Yes, I’m playing tennis this afternoon.
Oh, what about the sales meeting?
What sales meeting?
Did I forget to tell you? There’s a sales meeting this afternoon and Kathy wants everyone there.
But I’ve booked a tennis court and everyone’s coming.
Oh, that’s a shame.
I wish you’d told me.

I didn’t tell Jay about the meeting and he’s unhappy about that. He says ‘I wish you’d told me’.
Now, what’s that contraction? Is it would or had? It’s had. We’re using the past perfect again.
We use wish and the past perfect to express regrets about the past – to talk about things that didn’t happen, but we wish they had happened.

I wish Vicki had told me about the sales meeting.
I’m so tired. I wish I’d gone to bed earlier last night.
I wish we hadn’t eaten all those cookies.
Yeah, I’m feeling a little sick now.

These are all things that didn’t happen and we regret them now. We’re not happy about them.
I didn’t tell Jay about the sales meeting. I went to bed late last night and we ate all those cookies.
So if you wish something had happened, it didn’t happen.
And if wish something hadn’t happened, it did happen.
You have to switch positives to negatives, and vice versa, to imagine something unreal.
And remember the verb form here. It’s the past perfect.
Do these structures remind you of anything? They’re similar to third conditional structures – the conditionals we use for unreal and imaginary situations in the past.

Now you have to make a wish and blow out all the candles with one breath. Now take a big breath.

The idea of wishing is if you imagine something enough it will come true by magic. But of course magic isn’t real. When we say ‘I wish… ‘, we distance ourselves from reality and we do that grammatically by shifting back a tense. The same thing happens in 2nd and 3rd conditionals. They’re unreal too.
OK, one more thing before we stop, do you remember this phrase?
‘If only’ is like ‘I wish’, but it’s more emphatic. It means ‘I really wish’. We can use it to talk about present and past situations. Let’s see some past examples.

If only we hadn’t eaten all those cookies.
If only I’d studied harder at school.
If only I’d invested in Apple twenty years ago. I’d be rich now.

So again, these things didn’t happen. Jay ate the cookies. He didn’t study harder and he didn’t invest in Apple. But he’s wishing things were different. ‘If only’ means it’s a strong wish.
And that’s it. It was a lot of grammar so let’s review.
We use ‘hope’ with ‘would’ to talk about past hopes. You can use different past forms of hope. ‘Hoped’ and ‘was hoping’ aren’t specific. You can use them for things that happened or things that didn’t happen. If something didn’t happen and you want to be specific, use the past perfect form of ‘hope’.
If you’re talking about past wishes, use ‘wish’ and the past perfect. Switch positives to negatives and vice versa, to make things unreal
And if you want to add emphasis, use ‘if only’. ‘If only’ is followed by the same structures as ‘I wish…’
So now you know how we use the verbs ‘wish’ and ‘hope’ in English. Please share this lesson with a friend if you found it useful. Subscribe to our channel and click the notification bell so you don’t miss our future videos. Bye now.

This is Carter.
We adopted him when he was six years old. Now he’s eight.
He barks a lot when people come to the door.
He gets a little excited.
This is Carter.
We adopted him six years ago.

Click here to see part one on how we use hope and wish to talk about present situations.
Click here to find out how we use wish and hope to give good wishes to someone.
Click here to find out how we use hope, wait, expect and look forward to to talk about the future.

Hope and Wish – Part One – Present situations

Hope and Wish – Part One – Present situations

Learn the different meanings and grammar of the English verbs ‘hope’ and ‘wish’ in this video lesson. With clear examples and explanations you can master the tricky grammar. In part one you’ll learn about present situations.
You’ll learn three structures we commonly use with hope and three with wish, and you’ll also learn how to use the phrase if only to add emphasis.

Click here to see past two on how we use hope and wish to talk about past situations.
Click here to find out how we use wish and hope to give good wishes to someone.
Click here to find out how we use hope, wait, expect and look forward to to talk about the future.

Hope or wish? How to talk about present situations

We’ve had requests for a video about these verbs. There’s a lot to cover so we’re breaking it into two parts. We’ve already made another video about how we use these verbs to wish people nice things. You can see it here.
In this video we’re looking at different structures we use with wish and hope to talk about present situations. We’ll look at three structures with hope and three with wish and we’ll also look at another phrase you can use.
Wish and hope. We use both these verbs to say what we want or would like to happen. The difference is how possible or likely it is. With hope, there’s a real possibility.

I’m expecting a baby. I hope it’s a boy.

Is it possible she’ll have a boy? Yes. There’s a fifty-fifty chance. Notice the structure. After hope she used a present tense, but she was talking about a future event.
She could also say ‘I hope it will be a boy.’ That works too. But we often use the present tense because the verb hope already implies the future.
OK. Let’s look at another structure.

Are you going to go to college, Ksenia?
Yes, I’m hoping to study animal behavior.
Oh you’ll be great at that.

So Ksenia wants to study animal behavior. She isn’t sure if she can yet, but again, it’s a real possibility.
Notice she said hoping. She could also say I hope to study animal behavior. That’s correct too, but we often use hope in the progressive or continuous form.
And notice that ‘to’. We can follow hope with an infinitive form of a verb.
You can say ‘I hope to go to college’, or ‘I’m hoping to go to college’. But you can’t say ‘I hope go to college’. You need the ‘to’.
Great. So these are the key structures we use to talk about hopes we have in the present and we use them all to talk about future possibilities.
Now what about wish? Again we use wish for things we want to happen, but this time, it’s things that are not probable, or they’re things that can’t happen.

Hey, how’s it going.
I’m feeling a little down.
Ah. Well I just met our new neighbor.
Oh yeah, what’s he like?
His name is Tom and he speaks six languages.
Wow, how old is he?
About thirty.
Hmmm.
What’s the matter?
I wish I spoke six languages and I wish I were younger.
Oh, don’t be sad about it.
Hmmm.
I wish I knew how to cheer you up.

It’s impossible for Jay to be younger. He doesn’t speak six languages. And I don’t know how to cheer him up.
They’re things we want to happen, but they’re impossible. We’re sad about that so they’re things we regret.
So hopes are about real possibilities, but these wishes are about imaginary things and they express regrets.
Another way to think about the difference is hope is more optimistic than wish. If you’re optimistic, you think good things can happen. But if you’re pessimistic, you think they can’t, or they’re very unlikely.
So what’s the structure here?

I wish I were younger
I wish I spoke six languages.
I wish I knew how to cheer Jay up.

After wish we use a past tense verb. These are wishes we have in the present, but the past tense indicates it’s an imaginary or unreal situation.
Another thing. Notice Jay said ‘I were’, not ‘I was’. Normally the past tense of the verb ‘be’ goes I was… You were… He was… But after ‘wish’ we say ‘were’. Why? We just do. If you want to look it up, it’s called a subjunctive, but trust me. You don’t need to know. Just remember, with the verb be, use ‘were’ after wish. And if you forget, it’s no big deal. Native speakers often say ‘I wish I was…’ and ‘I wish he was…’. BUT if you’re taking an English exam like IELTS or TOEFL or Cambridge First Certificate, say were. They often have questions about the verb wish and you’ll need to be grammatically correct.
OK, ready for another one? There’s another structure we often use with ‘wish’. See if you can spot it.

You know I wish you would put the lid back on the toothpaste.
Hmph.
And I wish you wouldn’t leave the seat up on the toilet.
Hmph. You know what I wish.
What?
I wish you’d stop complaining.
Hmph.

I was complaining about Jay’s behavior. When we’re annoyed about something and we’re complaining, we use ‘wish’ with ‘would’.
We’re talking about something we’d like to happen, so this is similar to those wish sentences with the past tense. The difference is we want SOMETHING to change here, or we want SOMEONE to change their behavior.
Use wish with would when you’re annoyed about something and you want to complain.
OK, here’s a similar structure. This one’s easy. See if you can spot it.

I wish I could do that.

Jay said wish and could. So instead of would he said could.

I wish I could whistle.

We use would to talk about something we want to happen and could to talk about something we want to be able to do. Another example.

I wish we had more money, Jay.
Why?
Then we could go on vacation.
Yeah, Egypt.
Or Brazil.
Oh, I wish we could go to Brazil.

We want to travel but it’s impossible because we can’t afford it. Again we’re talking about something we regret here. We often use wish to to express regrets.
OK, now before we stop, there’s another phrase you’ll often hear – If only.

Do you think Carter likes it when I stroke his back?
Yes, I think he does.
I wish we knew what he was thinking.
Yeah, if only he could talk.

‘I wish’ and ‘If only’ mean the same thing, but ‘If only’ is a little stronger. We use it to express a strong wish. You can use it with all the same structures as wish, when you want to add emphasis.
And that’s it – that was the final phrase!
Phew! That was a lot of grammar, so let’s review. We looked at three structures with hope. We use these structures to talk about things that we want to happen in the future and they’re things that are possible.
And then we looked at three structures with wish. Again, things we want to happen, but this time they’re things that are impossible or unlikely to happen.
And then we looked at the phrase ‘if only’. We use this phrase with the same structures as wish when we want to express a strong feeling.
So now you know how we use hope and wish to talk about present situations. But what about past situations? We’re going to look at them in another video. So make sure you’ve subscribed to our channel and clicked the notification bell, so you don’t miss it.
If you’ve enjoyed this lesson, please share it with a friend and see you next Friday. Bye now.

Click here to see past two on how we use hope and wish to talk about past situations.
Click here to find out how we use wish and hope to give good wishes to someone.
Click here to find out how we use hope, wait, expect and look forward to to talk about the future.

How to wish someone something nice in English – wish or hope?

How to wish someone something nice in English – wish or hope?

Learn how to use the verbs wish and hope to give good wishes and say nice things to someone in English.
We use the verbs wish and hope differently. Wish is more formal so when someone is wishing someone something it’s more likely to be written English. When we’re talking about future possibilities we generally use ‘hope’. It’s the verb we commonly use to give good wishes.
In this video you’ll see lots of examples and learn some other common ways to wish people nice things, like ‘Have a nice day‘ and ‘Have a great weekend‘.


Click here to learn how to use the verbs wait, hope, expect and look forward to
Click here to learn more useful everyday English expressions.

How to give good wishes: wish or hope?

There’s a mistake English students often make when they want to give good wishes to someone. They muddle up wish and hope. Today we’re going to fix that and we’ll also show you some other ways to say nice things to people in English.

I’m off
Oh, where are you going?
To the dentist’s. Wish me luck.

‘Wish me luck’. Notice that structure. To wish somebody something.
We might write this message for a bride and groom when they get married. Or maybe a colleague is retiring from work. We might write this in their card. They’re nice things to write.
But they’re for written English and they’re quite formal. Someone might say them in an official speech at an important occasion. But if we want to wish someone something, we usually say ‘hope’ instead. So, ‘We hope you have a great life and lots of fun together’, or ‘I hope you have a wonderful retirement’.

I’m off
Oh, where are you going?
To the dentist’s. Wish me luck.
Have you got a problem then?
Yes, I’ve got a toothache.
I hope it’s nothing serious.
Thanks.

Jay said ‘Wish me luck’ and I said ‘I hope it’s nothing serious.’ I didn’t say ‘wish’. That would sound funny.
So if we’re making a wish, we don’t say wish. We say hope. Wow, sometimes English is weird. What’s going on?
Wishes are magical things. The idea is that if we think of or imagine something enough, it will come true. But we all know magic isn’t real. When we want to talk about things that are real possibilities, we use hope instead of wish.
This means that we say wish when we’re talking about the action of wishing. But if we’re actually doing the action and giving good wishes to someone, it’s different. We don’t normally say wish when we’re talking about real possibilities.
It’s tricky so let’s look at some more situations. Imagine you’re saying goodbye to someone at an airport. What will you say to them?
These sentences are both grammatically correct, but I wish you a nice flight is very formal. We don’t normally say it. We say ‘I hope you have a nice flight’, or just ‘Have a nice flight.’ We often use the verb ‘have’ when we’re wishing people things.

  • Have a nice day.
    Have a great vacation.
    Have a nice trip.
    Have a great weekend.

OK, another situation. Your friend is sick. You call them and what do you say?
You say ‘I hope’, of course. When we’re doing the action of wishing we use hope not wish. And often we just say ‘Get well soon.’
OK. Another situation. Someone calls to wish your friend a happy birthday. But your friend is out so you take a message. What do you say to your friend when they return?
Which one? Let’s see it in action.

Thanks for calling. Yeah, I’ll tell him. OK. Bye now. Oh.
Who was that?
Kathy.
Uh oh. What did she want this time?
She called to wish you a happy birthday.
Oh that was nice of her.
And she wants you to work late tonight.
Oh.

So which sentence did I say? I said wish. I was talking about a wish, not doing the action and making the wish.
If I wanted to make the wish, I’d do it like this.

Hey Jay, happy birthday.
Oh thank you.
I hope you like them.
Oh I’m sure I will. It’s hair curlers?
Yes. Can I borrow them some time?
Errr. Sure.
Thank you!

So to make the wish, I just said ‘happy birthday.’ And did you notice what I said about the hair curlers?
We can say ‘I hope you like them’ or ‘I hope that you like them’. Both are correct. We often we skip ‘that’ when we’re speaking.
Great. So now you know how we use ‘hope’ to give good wishes, and you also know about this structure and when to use it.
But this structure is just the start. There are other structures we use with ‘hope’ and ‘wish’ so we’re making more videos about them.
Make sure you’ve subscribed to our channel and click the notification bell so you don’t miss them. And maybe your friends would like to learn about hope and wish too. Why not share this video with them? See you next Friday.
Click here to learn more useful everyday English expressions.
Click here to learn how to use the verbs wait, hope, expect and look forward to

Potato Chips with ESL students from the New York Film Academy (NYFA)

Potato Chips with ESL students from the New York Film Academy (NYFA)

We’re proud to present a video called Potato Chips that we made with students studying ESL and filmmaking at the New York Film Academy (NYFA).
It includes some useful slang and informal English expressions: stressed out, chill out and screw it.
The students came up with the concept for the video and they were our cast and crew. They were also a joy to work with.

Click here to watch more of our stories and songs

Potato Chips with ESL students from the New York Film Academy (NYFA)

We have something very special for you today.
Last month we collaborated with students from the ESL school at the New York Film Academy.
They’re studying English and filmmaking at the same time.
The students came up with a concept for a video and we shot it together at the YouTube Space.
They were our cast and crew and we’re very proud to present their story today!
You’re going to hear some informal English expressions and slang, so keep watching and we’ll talk about them on the other side.
Great, let’s roll the video.

No!
Hey, is everything OK?
Not really.
What’s going on?
I have so much to do.
Oh you’re stressed out.
Yes.
Hey, hey. Calm down. Relax.
No. I need to get to work.
No, no, no, no. You need some ‘lazy skills’.
Lazy skills?
Yes, so when you’re alone and you want to chill out. Let me teach you.
OK.
So show me how you sit on this chair. No. It should be more like this. Yeah. It’s better. You need some practice. Second step. Eat some chips.
No thanks.
Come on…
Mmm. It’s delicious. I love it.
No, but you should eat like a pig. Watch me.
It’s perfect! Now step three. OK. Let’s dance!
No, no, no, no.
Dance, dance, dance. Yes! You can. You can. Come! Here! Ah no, you should be more relaxed. Now follow me. Yeah.
Mmm. Ah. I feel so good. I’m much more relaxed.
Yeah. What we need now is a party. Let’s call some friends.
I don’t have any friends.
Don’t worry. I do.
Hi everyone. Come in.
How are you?
I’m fine.
Hi.
Hallo. Hallo. Hallo. Thank you for inviting us. We love a party!
It’s great to see you, Mao. We’ve brought some drinks and chips.
Oh thank you. So I want you all to meet my friend Sherry.
Oh, where’s Sherry?
This is a great apartment, Mao.
Thank you.
It’s a great party too. Have a chip, Sherry.
Thank you.
She is very hungry.
Hey, let’s put some music on.
That’s a great idea.
Sherry, Sherry, Sherry. It’s so embarrassing!
That’s what you taught me right? Just have fun! Come on.
Oh. Yeah. Screw it!

Ha! Wow! They were terrific, weren’t they?
Yeah, it was such fun to work with them.
Now what about the language we heard?
There were several expressions we should look at. The first one was stressed out.
Let’s hear it.

What’s going on?
I have so much to do.
Oh you’re stressed out.


Stressed out is an adjective and it means you’re so worried and tired that you can’t relax.
We can also say stressed, with no out.
Yes, but when we’re speaking informally to our friends we often say stressed out.
If you’re stressed out you need to calm down and chill out.
Chill out. That was another one.

You need some ‘lazy skills’.
Lazy skills?
Yes, so when you’re alone and you want to chill out. Let me teach you.

Chill out is informal as well.
Yes, it means spend time relaxing, so you’re not tired or nervous.
Now what about those lazy skills? We don’t usually use that phrase.
Yes, this was a joke. The joke works because of the word skills. Skills are normally things we work at.
A skill is the ability to do something well. We have to learn and practice to develop skills.
But we don’t have to practice to be lazy. We just have to do nothing.
We don’t say lazy skills, but we do say relaxation skills. Breathing and yoga can be relaxation skills.
And they’re things we have to work at. Not like eating potato chips.
OK, one more.
Yes, this one is really informal – it’s slang.

That’s what you taught me, right? Just have fun! Come on.
Oh. Yeah. Screw it!

Screw it – it’s slang and it’s pretty rude slang.
It’s something we only say when we’re with friends – close friends.
Don’t say it to your boss.
OK, so what does it mean?
It means I’m giving up. I’m not going to try any more.
Yes, if we’ve been trying to do something and it’s not working, we can say ‘Oh screw it’, and then stop trying.
So it’s like I don’t care any more. I’m not giving any more time or thought to this.
Yeah, Screw it. I’ll stop.
But be careful who you say it to.
OK, if you’d like to see more of our videos, make sure you subscribe.
And share them with your friends so they can learn English too.
And that’s it for today
But before we stop I want to say a BIG thank you to the ESL students at the New York Film Academy.
I think they’re all going to be stars.
See you next week everyone.
Bye now.
Click here to watch more of our stories and songs

Likely: An English Word You’re Likely to Need!

Likely: An English Word You’re Likely to Need!

Learn how to to talk about probability in English with the word likely. It’s a word you’re likely to need!
In this video you’ll learn the common structures and collocations we use with likely and see how we use them in action. You’ll also learn an idiom where we always use it ironically.
And finally you’ll learn what happens to a marshmallow if you cook it in the microwave for 60 seconds. Mmmm. Irresistable!

Click here to learn how to talk about possibilities with if and in case.
Click here to learn some more ways we talk about the future.

An important word for talking about what’s probable

In today’s lesson we’re going to perform an experiment.
We’re going to cook this marshmallow in the microwave.
What do you think is likely to happen?
Yeah, what’s the likely outcome – the likely result?
Keep watching and you’ll find out.

Here’s a word you’re likely to need. What kind of word is it? An adjective? An adverb? It looks like an adverb, and it can be, but it can also be an adjective. Likely means probable or expected. So a likely outcome or result is one we think is probable.
We use likely is several different ways so let’s see some examples.

A giant storm has hit the north east of the US from Washington all the way up to Boston. Many school are closed, flights are canceled and wide-scale damage is more than likely. Let’s check in with our correspondent in Philadelphia, Vicki Hollett. Vicki, tell us all about this snow.
Hello Jay. As you can see we’re in the middle of a big storm here. They’re saying we’re very likely to get a foot of snow today with strong winds topping 60 miles per hour. It’s also likely there will be power outages.
The snow looks very pretty but the forecast is serious, right?
Yes. This snow isn’t light and fluffy. It’s wet, heavy snow. And that means when it accumulates on the branches, they’re likely to bend and break and that can bring down power lines creating more chaos.
So it’s unlikely that things will be back to normal any time soon. Is there any news on when the snow’s going to stop?
Yes. It’s not likely to stop until late tonight, with the winds getting worse. Oh my!
OK, thanks Vicki. Stay safe out there and keep warm. Vicki? Vicki?

We saw lots of examples there. Here’s the first pattern to note and it’s very common. We can use likely in front of verbs – notice the infinitive forms of verbs.

They’re saying we’re very likely to get a foot of snow today.
When it accumulates on the braches, they’re likely to bend and break.

So ‘to get’ – ‘to bend’, infinitive forms of verbs.
And notice that ‘very’. If we want to add emphasis, we use adverbs like very, highly, extremely, quite, and it makes the meaning stronger. These words all collocate with likely which means you’ll often see them together, and the phrases all mean we think something is very probable. Here’s a similar one.

Many schools are closed, flights are canceled and wide-scale damage is more than likely.

If something is ‘more than likely’ then it’s more probable than probable – it’s almost certain.
Now, here’s a question. What’s the opposite of likely? We can say NOT likely.

Yes. It’s not likely to stop until late tonight.

And we can also say unlikely.
So it’s unlikely that things will be back to normal any time soon.
Likely – unlikely – they’re opposites. Notice those sentences both started with it’s. It is. It’s is a sort of dummy subject here. And let’s look at the second one again. Sometimes likely is followed by a ‘that clause’ and ‘will’. So likely that, and ‘will’. Here’s another example.

It’s also likely that there will be power outages.

This isn’t the most common pattern. Likely and the infinitive verb is more common, but you’ll see both structures.
Great! So now you know the key patterns to use with likely. What do you think? Are you likely to use the word likely? Tell us something that’s likely to happen or likely not to happen in the comments.
And what about those marshmallows? Do you remember that experiment? Let’s find out what happens.

What’s going to happen if we cook this marshmallow in the microwave for sixty seconds?
I’ve no idea.
Well, let’s try.
OK.
Right, I’m going to put it on for sixty seconds. What do you think is likely to happen? Do you think it’s likely to melt and turn into liquid?
Maybe. Or is it likely to turn brown and burn?
Do you think it’s likely to explode like a bomb?
Oh my goodness. I hope not.
I’m just glad that the microwave hasn’t blown up. It still could. Ooo. It’s coming down.
One. Aha! It’s stopped.
OK, let’s open the door and see what it’s like. Oh wow! Well look at that. That is one big marshmallow! This was the size that it went in at. And this is the size now.
That’s huge.
I know. It’s amazing, isn’t it. I’m going to squish it. Oh Jay. You’re going to love this.
I love marshmallows.

OK, the last thing. Here’s one more expression with likely. What do you think it means?
If story is likely it should be probable and expected, so something that sounds true and you can believe it easily. But we always use this particular phrase ironically, so it means the opposite. Instead of a story you can believe, it means a story you can’t believe. Something that can’t be true. Let’s see it in action.

Jay, I don’t understand. There were lots of marshmallows in this bag. Where have they gone?
The dog ate them.
Really?
Yes. Carter ate them all.
A likely story.

What do you think? Should I believe Jay or not? And what will your friends think? Why not send them a link to this video so they can tell you and learn some English too. We’ll be back next Friday, so make sure you subscribe and click that notification bell so you don’t miss our future videos. Bye!
Click here to learn how to talk about possibilities with if and in case.
Click here to learn some more ways we talk about the future.

SEVY Speak English Challenge Awards Ceremony

SEVY Speak English Challenge Awards Ceremony

Do you need to understand people speaking English with different accents? Then you’re going to love this video.
A couple of weeks ago we set our viewers a challenge: to send us video telling us who they are, where they’re from and what they do in English.
And they did! We were blown away by the videos we received. We can’t give everyone an Oscar but we can award them a SEVY – a Simple English Videos Award. Welcome to the SEVY awards video!
Congratulations and thank you so much to everyone who took part. You were brilliant!

SEVY Awards Ceremony

Hello everyone. A few weeks ago we gave our viewers a challenge – a speaking challenge.
We asked all of our learners to send us a video telling us who you are, where you’re from and what you do.
And we got some replies.
We’re they any good?
Yes, they were brilliant. They all deserve an Oscar.
Ah, well we’ve invented a different kind of an award called a SEVY, or Simple English Videos Award.
And so welcome to the SEVY presentation ceremony.
Shall we look at the first video?
Yeah, come on. Let’s go.

Hello Vicki and Jay. This is Jack. I come from China. I’m a student.

His pronunciation was really good.
Yes. English is his favourite subject. Jack, you get the first SEVY for pronunciation.
Thank you Jack from China. Let’s go onto the next one.

Hello Vicki. Hello Jay. I’m Emad from Egypt. I’m an electrical engineer, happy to enjoy this experience. Thanks a lot.

Thank you Emad from Egypt and we’re so glad you enjoyed the experience.
And you get the SEVY for coming from a place we’d both like to visit.
We’ve never been to Egypt and we would really like to be there.
But you know there’s someone else from Egypt.
Oh right. Let’s check that out.

Good morning, Vicki. Good morning, Jay. My name is Ahmed. I’m from Egypt and I live in Cairo. I’m an English language teacher and I teach English to adults. That’s all for now. I hope you like my video. Goodbye.

Ahmed gets the SEVY for multi-tasking. Walking while shooting.
He’s very athletic.
And his pronunciation is really excellent.
Yes, apparently he’s never been to the UK, but he watches the BBC world Service all the time. So it really works!
Obviously. Next one.

Hi! My name is Ashish, and I am from Varanasi, India. Now I’m working in Samsung Electronics as a promoter.

Thank you Ashish from India.
Yes, can you guess what SEVY we’re going to give to Ashish?
Hmm, oh I know. Best costume.
That’s right. Did you notice? He was wearing and English football team jersey. He’s a fan! OK, next one is our youngest viewer.
Oh let’s see that.

I’m Elizabeth. I’m in Malaga. I’m in Malaga, Spain and I’m a student.

That’s Elizabeth from Malaga and she’s a student. How old is Elizabeth?
Four.
Oh, I’m impressed.
Apparently she likes to sit on her mother’s lap and watch our videos, and her favourite video is the one we made at Halloween.
Oh, mine too. Hello Elizabeth.
Hello Elizabeth. Shall we see her Mum?
Absolutely.

My name is Amanda. I’m from Guadalajara, Mexico but now I’m living in Malaga, Spain. I have multiple jobs. That means that I am mother of two little children. Bye.

So she’s originally from Mexico, now she’s in Malaga, Spain and she has multiple jobs.
Yes. Amanda, you win the SEVY for the best joke! Two children – multiple jobs.
Oh got it! Who’s next.

Hello. I’m Suzanne. I’m French. I live in a little town to the south of Lyon. I’m now retired but I was a German teacher. Thank you very much for your videos. I find them very useful. Good-bye.

Auf wiedersehen, Suzanne.
So she speaks French, German, English.
Right! She gets the linguist SEVY.
Yes, and she also gets the SEVY for being the first responder, because she sent us the video first.
Thank you Suzanne. Let’s see who’s next.

Hello Vicki and Jay. I’m Aki from Japan. I live in Australia at the moment. I work as a Japanese language assistant. I’m a big fan of your channel so please keep up the good work. Thank you. Bye.
Aki wins the SEVY for best vocabulary. She said ‘Keep up the good work’.

Yes. She’s lived in England, you know.
I didn’t know.
And I think she’s been to America once. Aki, if you come back, you must look us up.
Right, let’s see who’s next.

Hello Vicki, hello Jay! My name is Jerome. I come from Nice. This is a beautiful city in the southeast of France. This is close to Monaco, but due to my job now I live in Monaco. It’s still in France, but it’s closer to the mountains of Switzerland. I work for an important airport operator. I am the quality, safety, security, environment and complaints manager. And working in an international context at an airport pushes me everyday to improve my English a lot, and this is why I have decided to follow your YouTube channel. Thank you for everything. Cheers!

Jerome gets the SEVY for confidence.
Yes. He’s a very confident speaker. Apparently in his last job he used to use English a lot, but he uses it less in the current job, so he comes to our channel to practise.
That’s a very good idea because if you don’t use it, you lose it.
Good point! OK, next one.

Hi everyone. I’m Lucas from Brazil and I live here in Sao Paulo. I’m a student. I study petroleum engineering, also known as oil engineering, and this is my last year of college.

Lucas wins the SEVY for fluency and clarity.
Lucas we love Brazil. Vicki and I have been there a number of times and we can’t wait to go back.
Lucas has got a competitive exam in the next few weeks that’s very hard.
Good luck Lucas.
Good luck Lucas. OK, next one.

Hello! I’m Mario from north Italy. I live in the province of Provencia. I’m a farmer. I would like to become a professional singer as soon as possible. See you soon, bye!

Mario gets the SEVY for the most unusual job.
What does Mario sing?
Italian pop songs, but he also sings in English. Like Frank Sinatra.
Oh Mario, I wish we could hear you sing.
That would be so cool.
Let’s see who’s next.

Hi. I’m Ying Tao. I come from China. Now I live in Philadelphia in the United States. I’m a software engineer and I’m developing some apps for mobile phones.

So Ying Tao is right here in Philadelphia.
Yes, we live in Philadelhia too. And Yong Tao you get the SEVY for being closest to us. And one afternoon we’ll go out and have a coffee together.
We wish we could have a coffee with all of you.
Or a party.
Right.
It’s been FANTASTIC to receive your videos, and to get to know you a little bit better because we make the videos and we have no idea who’s watching them so this has been marvelous for us.
It’s really been nice to meet you. Thank you so much for sending the videos. Have a great week everyone and we’ll see you next Friday.
Bye!

Learn English Phrasal Verbs for Organizing Things

Learn English Phrasal Verbs for Organizing Things

Learn the meanings of common phrasal verbs like tidy up, throw away, lying around, put away and lots more. In this video English lesson you’ll see Jay and Vicki organizing their props and costumes and see how they use the phrasal verbs in action.

Click here to learn 24 phrasal verbs for computers and technology
Click here to learn 10 phrasal verbs for food and eating
Click here to learn 8 very common separable phrasal verbs

Organizing Phrasal Verbs

Hi. Today we’re going to show you some of the props and costumes that we use in our videos.
It’s a bit of a mess so we’re going to organize them today.

This lesson is about phrasal verbs we use to talk about organizing things. The best way to learn their meanings is to see them in action so we’re going to play a game. Watch Jay and I talking about our props and costumes and see how many phrasal verbs you can spot. You’ll hear 13 of them.

Jay and I aren’t very tidy.
We don’t have one place in our house to keep all our props and costumes.
They’re scattered all over the house.
So it’s time to tidy up.
Yes, and I’ve got a prop box ready so we can keep them all in that.
We’ve laid out lots of our props and costumes so we can see what we’ve got.
Yep. Let’s start with this one.
Oh, a toy truck.
A toy truck. I don’t think we need it any more.
I don’t think we’ll ever use this again.
Throw it out.
I will throw it away.
OK, we’ve got lots of hats.
Ooh, this is my magician’s hat
Yes.
I used this hat to send you to Paris with this magic wand.
Yes, a magic wand is a magician’s stick. And your chef’s hat.
Oh, very good. Could you cook something for me?
Oh and you can be a king someday.
This is a crown.
And you’ve got… erm, OK, you’ve got cowboy hats as well.
Well now this is a cowboy hat that a criminal cowboy would wear, right?
What, the baddie?
Yeah, the bad guy.
OK, and that one?
And this would be a cowboy hat a good guy would wear. Right?
Yeah. Look. Do you remember that one?
Oh yes. Rachel wore this in one of our airport videos.
That’s right. And I wore this when I was a cop.
OK. Sort the hats out. Sort them out and we’ll put them together.
There we go.
OK.
Oh look. This is a crystal ball. Tell me the future.
I know. I want to do a scene with a fortune teller where they forecast the future, but I haven’t got round to it yet.
Well, maybe you’ll do it someday soon.
Ok.
Here is a white coat. Oh this is my doctor’s outfit.
It’s really useful that coat because it can be for a doctor or it can be for a shop assistant sometimes like in a chemist’s, or as you would say, a pharmacy.
This comes with a stethoscope, doesn’t it?
Yep, there you are. This is a stethoscope.
All right. Let’s see how this works.
Now, I’ll put this in the prop box, but we should hang that up…
Or else it will get creased, right?
Yep. Hang it up. Here you are.
No problem. Thank you very much.
Ooh. Look what I found.
This is Vicki’s wig, but I think I want to try it.
A wig is false hair. We bought this for the Halloween video that we did. Hang on, I’ll straighten it out for you. It’s very good. I love it.
Oh, is this a table cloth?
Yes, that’s for when we want to set up a restaurant scene.
Oh, we’ve done that.
Yeah.
We had Carter eating in a restaurant, didn’t we?
Yep, and also next time we can use some flowers and it can be a posh restaurant.
Ah, very good. Ooh, Look.
There’s one of these missing. There should be four of these.
There’s one lying around in kitchen.
Oh, right. We’re not very tidy. I’ve been looking for this.
That’s a magnifying glass. I came across this in my office. I use it to find things on my desk.
OK. Are we done?
No, there’s a slate here.
A slate. I… I think people call it a clapperboard as well, don’t they?
Right. It’s used to synchronize cameras and audio. Take one!
Ok, so give it to me and I’ll put it in the prop box.
No, it belongs in my office.
OK, well put it away then.
I shall.
OK, that’s it everyone.

How many phrasal verbs did you spot? The first one was tidy up. If we tidy a place we make it look nice because everything is arranged neatly and put in the right place. But we can also say tidy up. It means the same thing.

We don’t have one place in our house to keep all our props and costumes.
They’re scattered all over the house.
So it’s time to tidy up.
Yes.

You’ll also hear people say tidy away. It’s similar to tidy up. It means to put things in the place they belong.
OK, the next one was lay out. This means to spread things. We usually lay things out so we can see them easily, or so they’re ready to use.

We’ve laid out lots of our props and costumes so we can see what we’ve got.
Yep.

OK, the next two were throw out and throw away. They can mean the same thing. If you have something you don’t need or don’t want any more and you dispose of it or get rid of it, you throw it out or throw it away.

A toy truck. I don’t think we need it any more.
I don’t think we’ll ever use this again.
Throw it out.
I will throw it away.

Next was sort out and it can mean a couple of things in the context of tidying. One is simply to organize – so to arrange and tidy. And the second meaning is to separate different types of things. I used it to say we should separate the hats from the other props.

OK. Sort the hats out. Sort them out and we’ll put them together.
There we go.

OK, next one: to get round to. This means to find time to do something. Perhaps there’s a job that you’ve been meaning to do for a long time, but you haven’t got round to it. You haven’t found time to do it yet. Tell us in the comments.

I want to do a scene with a fortune teller where they forecast the future, but I haven’t got round to it yet.
Well, maybe you’ll do it someday soon.

The next one’s easy to understand. To hang up means put to clothes on a hanger or a hook.

I’ll put this in the prop box, but we should hang that up…
Or else it will get creased, right?
Yep. Hang it up. Here you are.
No problem.

Another phrasal verb with hang is hang on. Hang on is an informal way of asking someone to wait, or stop what they’re doing for a short time.
And the next one. To straighten out means to make something straight, so put it in the correct position so it’s not curved or at an angle. We could just say straighten, that’s the verb, but you’ll often hear straighten out too.

We bought this for the Halloween video that we did. Hang on, I’ll straighten it out for you.

Next one. Set up has several different meanings. It often means make necessary arrangements for something to happen, so you can set up a meeting or an appointment. And it can also mean get equipment or materials ready for use and that’s how we used it here.

Oh, is this a table cloth?
Yes, that’s for when we want to set up a restaurant scene.
Oh, we’ve done that.

OK, next one. If someone has left something somewhere in a careless way, an untidy way, we can say it’s lying around. Jay and are bad at putting things back where they belong so you’ll often find things lying around in our house.

There’s one of these missing. There should be four of these.
There’s one lying around in kitchen.
Oh, right. We’re not very tidy.

In British English we also say lying about. It means the same as lying around.
OK, we’re nearly finished. The next one was come across and it means to find or discover something by chance.

I came across this in my office.

And the last one. When we put something away, we put it in the place it should be kept. When we’ve finished using things we should put them away, so as to be tidy.

Ok, so give it to me and I’ll put it in the prop box.
No, it belongs in my office.
OK, well put it away then.
I shall.

And that’s it! If you enjoyed this videos, why not share it with a friend who’s also learning English? And if you’d like to learn some more phrasal verbs, click here and make sure you subscribe to our channel too, so you don’t miss our future videos. See you next Friday everyone. Bye.

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