If and In Case

If and In Case: Simple English Videos Lesson

You shouldn’t put the knives in that way. It’ll be all right. Someone will cut themselves if you put them in like that. No they won’t. Ow! Luckily I put some plasters here in case there was an accident. Thank you. We use ‘if’ and ‘in case’ to talk about future possibilities. But they mean different things. Are we driving to New York tomorrow? I don’t know. We might have to. We need to fill the car with petrol if we do. We can do that in the morning. OK. Are we driving to New York tomorrow? I don’t know. We might have to. I’ll fill the car with petrol now, in case we do. See you later. ‘If’ is about things we’ll do later, if something else happens. ‘In case’ is about things we do now, so we’re ready for something that might happen in the future. So ‘in case’ is useful for talking about precautions, when we try to avoid problems in the future. Ow! Luckily, I put some plasters here in case there was an accident. Oh! Are you going out? Yeah. Take your phone in case I need to call you. OK. Err, and take your keys. Just in case I’m not here when you get back. OK. And take your unbrella, just in case it should rain. I’m only going next door. Oh! Notice the forms we use: simple present, simple past, and ‘should’. But we don’t use ‘will’ and we don’t use ‘would’. These phrases are wrong. Why not write that down, just in case you forget? This is my wife’s idea, and I must say I think it’s rather dangerous. I suppose you all know how to use one of these things, but in case you don’t… You just press down on this lever with your thumb and then pull the trigger.

4 thoughts on “If and In Case

  • October 9, 2014 at 3:30 pm
    Permalink

    Tick all the correct endings in the sentences below.
    1. Take an umbrella in case …
    • it should rain.
    • it will rain.
    • it would rain.
    • it starts raining.
    2. Take your phone, just in case …
    • she will call.
    • she needs to call you.
    • she calls.
    • she would call.
    3. I wrote the number down in case …
    • we would forget it.
    • we would forgot it.
    • we forgot it.
    • we should forgot it.
    4. Bring your driving licence, just in case …
    • you need some ID.
    • you should need some ID.
    • someone asks to see your ID.
    • someone would ask to see your ID.
    5. I reserved the room till 5pm in case …
    • the meeting went on longer than expected.
    • the meeting goes on longer than expected.
    • the meeting would go on longer than expected
    • the meeting will go on longer than expected.

    Reply
  • October 11, 2014 at 6:49 pm
    Permalink

    1. it should rain, it starts raining.
    2. she needs to call you, she calls.
    3. we forgot it.
    4. you need some ID, someone asks to see your ID.
    5. the meeting went on longer than expected, the meeting goes on longer than expected.

    Reply
    • October 13, 2014 at 11:19 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Amr. Great job – well done!
      1. CORRECT!
      2. CORRECT!
      3. CORRECT!
      4. Both correct and you can add ‘you should need some ID’, too. It’s a bit convoluted though, so I doubt many people would say it.
      5. CORRECT!

      Reply

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