24 essential phrasal verbs for computers and technology

24 essential phrasal verbs for computers and technology

If you need to learn computer words and computer terms, you’re going to love these phrasal verbs. They’re also useful if you need English for work or for using the internet.
Watch the video and learn the meanings of 24 computer phrasal verbs. And best of all – you get to practice them in a funny story.

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Computer Terms Phrasal Verbs Video

This lesson’s about phrasal verbs we use to talk about computers and technology. We’re going to look 24 common ones, learn their meanings and then we’ll have a story, because the best way to learn phrasal verbs is to see them in action.
Before we begin, there’s something you need to know about English phrasal verbs. Some are separable and some aren’t. So sometimes we can separate the verb from the other little word and sometimes we can’t.
For example, ‘plug in’ is a separable phrasal verb, so you can plug in a device or you can plug it in.
We say it in both ways but we don’t say ‘plug in it’. If you’re not sure about that, we’ve made another video about it. I’ll put a link here.
Inseparable phrasal verbs are different because we can’t separate the words. They stick together. For example, ‘get into’ is inseparable in this sentence and it means enter. If you can’t access the system, you can’t get into it. But you can’t say ‘get the system into’. Get and into stick together.
OK, now you know that, let’s look at some phrasal verbs and see what they mean.
First one. Before you use your computer you have to hook it up – connect the cables and give it power.
Next one? This is easy – you turn the computer on. Press a switch so it starts working. And what’s the opposite? It’s turn off, of course.
And here’s a very similar one. Power up means preparing a machine to work by supplying it with electricity. And the opposite? Power down.
When you turn on your computer it boots up. It starts working and loads a program so it’s ready to be used. Sometimes we just say boot.

I’m waiting for my computer to boot.

But often we say boot up.

It takes ages to boot up.

And the opposite of boot up is shut down. It means to stop it operating.

Sometimes I forget to shut down my computer before I go home. It means it’s running all night.

Next one? Or next two! They both mean the same thing – connect to a network. Usually we need a password to log in. You can say log in or log on – it’s the same. So what’s the opposite? Log off or log out. That’s when you disconnect from a network.
Now look what happens when there’s an object. The preposition changes and we say log into, log onto, log off of or log out of. They’re all inseparable so the verbs and the other little words stick together.
However we can also log someone into a system – that’s when we do it for them.

Can you log me onto the network?
Yeah. Do you have a password?
No.
You’ll need to create one first.

Next one?
‘Put in’ means type. Sometimes we say ‘key in’ as well – it means the same thing. It’s when you enter data.

OK, I’ve got my password.
Then put it in.

OK, we’re in the system now and we’re working on our computer, then a message suddenly appears – it pops up. Maybe it’s an advertisement or a warning. They pop up a lot.

I hate the ads that keep popping up.
Yeah. Click on the red cross and they’ll go away.

Click on – this means move your mouse onto something and click. Another thing we do with our mouse is scroll.

There are so many ads.
Can you scroll down past them?

Scrolling down means moving the screen down and the opposite is scrolling up, of course. We can also zoom in and make things larger. And the opposite? Zoom out.
Next one. It’s always a good idea back up your files. Make a copy of them so you have a second version if the first one fails
And, I have just one more for you. This is when people get into a network secretly, without permission. They look at information, and maybe change or steal it.

Hey, do you think someone’s hacked into our system?
I hope not!

Great, now let’s see some of these verbs in action. Are you ready for a story. Watch it and see how many phrasal verbs you can spot. Here we go.

Computer help desk.
I need your help. I can’t log into the system.
I can help you with that. You need to hook up your computer. Plug it in and power it up.
I’ve already done all that.
So you’ve turned it on?
Yes, it’s on. I need you to log me onto the network.
You want to get into the system.
Yes. I can’t get in.
Then I need you user ID.
It’s 46821. Please hurry up because I’ve got a conference call starting in five minutes.
OK. I just sent you a link.
Really?
Click on the link and then scroll down.
Ah. A message just popped up.
What does it say?
‘Are you a robot?’ It wants me to type two words in a little box.
Oh. Are you a robot?
No, of course not!
Sometimes robots try to hack into our system.
I’m a human being!
Then just put in the words. Key them in.
It’s impossible. I can’t read them.
Sorry then. I can’t help you.
Why not?
You’re a robot.
I’m not a robot. It’s impossible to read these words.
Sorry, I can’t help robots. Bye.
Ah well. Mission failed. Mission failed. Mission fail. Mission fail. Mission fail. Mission…

How many phrasal verbs did you spot? Let’s watch again and this time we’ll see them pop up.

Computer help desk.
I need your help. I can’t log into the system.
I can help you with that. You need to hook up your computer. Plug it in and power it up.
I’ve already done all that.
So you’ve turned it on?
Yes, it’s on. I need you to log me onto the network.
You want to get into the system.
Yes. I can’t get in.
Then I need you user ID.
It’s 46821. Please hurry up because I’ve got a conference call starting in five minutes.
OK. I just sent you a link.
Really?
Click on the link and then scroll down.
Ah. A message just popped up.
What does it say?
‘Are you a robot?’ It wants me to type two words in a little box.
Oh. Are you a robot?
No, of course not!
Sometimes robots try to hack into our system.
I’m a human being!
Then just put in the words. Key them in.
It’s impossible. I can’t read them.
Sorry then. I can’t help you.
Why not?
You’re a robot.
I’m not a robot. It’s impossible to read these words.
Sorry, I can’t help robots. Bye.
Ah well. Mission failed. Mission failed. Mission fail. Mission fail. Mission fail. Mission…

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Economic, Economy, Economize – an English word family

Economic, Economy, Economize – an English word family

This lesson’s about economy words, so an English word family: economy, economize, economic, economical, economist, economics. They’re words you’ll often see in the news and they’re going to be useful if you’re using English at work or taking an exam.
Let’s compare their different meanings, uses and pronunciations.



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Economic, Economy, Economize etc. Video script

Come on over here everyone. Come on up front. Get your words here. Six words for the price of one. It’s a bargain!

Here’s a family words that you’ll often hear in the news. They’re useful if you need English for work or business, or if you’re taking an exam. They all come from the same root and they all mean something to do with money.
Let’s start with economy. This is about a system where money and goods are produced by a country. All countries want to grow their economies.
Hi everybody. Our top priority as a nation must be growing the economy. Creating good jobs and rebuilding opportunity for the middle class.
Now in a lot of languages people talk about the economy of company too, but English is different. When we’re talking about how much money a company has and how its managed, we usually say finances instead.

Jay.
Yes?
We need to talk about the company’s finances.
How are we doing?
Not good. Sales are down.
Well the economy’s been bad for everyone.

So we generally talk about the economy of a country and the finances of a company. Remember that. OK, next up we have a verb.

We’re spending too much money. We need to economize.
Impossible!
Do you really need to fly first class all the time?
Absolutely! I love the champagne they serve.
Well, we’ve got to cut down somehow.

So economizing means cutting down and trying to use less money than normal. So that’s a new meaning. It’s about trying to save money.
Great. Let’s look at two adjectives now. Economic and economical. They mean different things. We can say economic or economic and we can say economical or economical, but they mean different things.

And now financial news. Despite difficult economic conditions in Europe, the global economy continues to grow.

Economic means relating to the economy – production, trade, managing money. Economical is different.

You know we should buy bigger bags of pistachios.
Mmm. It would be more economical.

Economical is about using money carefully, so there’s no waste. So we’ve got these two different meanings again – money and saving money.
OK, just two more words. First one. What’s an economist?

And now for $100, can you name the economist who wrote the wealth of nations?
Ooo. I can. I can. It was Adam Smith.
You’re right for 100 dollars. Congratulations.

An economist is a person who studies economies. And the subject they study is… economics. The study of how money and goods are produced.
Economist. Economics. Notice the pronunciation. The stress moved. Let’s check all the words for that. Say them with me.
eCONomy
eCONomize
ecoNOMic
ecoNOMical
eCONomist
ecoNOMics
Now there are other words and meanings you can add to this family but you’ve got the basics here. Just remember there are two different ideas going on – money and saving money.
So that’s it for this week everyone. Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel, if you haven’t already and see you next Friday! Bye!

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English words for money, tax and taxes – learn with Donald Trump

English words for money, tax and taxes – learn with Donald Trump

Learn English vocabulary for money, tax and taxes from a conversation with Donald Trump. We look at the meanings of words like tax, accountant, income, expenses, tax return and audit, along with other words and expressions.
We have also created a free worksheet to practice words and phrases in the video that you can find here:

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Talking Tax and Taxes with Trump Script

Hello and welcome to Simple English Videos where today we’re looking at English words for money and taxes. And we have an expert to help us – President Trump. Mr. President, thank you so much for joining us today.
Well, it’s a pleasure to have you here.
We’ll have to see what happens.
OK, the first word is tax? It’s an interesting noun because it can be countable or uncountable. And it means the money we must pay to the government, right?
I think I can agree with that.
Great.
I think the rules are unbelievably archaic and slow moving and in many cases unfair.
So you think the tax system is old fashioned and we should change it?
It’s just a very, very bureaucratic system.
Bureaucratic – another useful word. It means it involves a lot of complicated rules and processes. That’s why many people employ an accountant to help. Could you explain what your accountant does?
Well, it’s a … it’s a tough job.
Yes, keeping financial records, calculating taxes…
I have a very big tax return. You’ve seen the pictures. My tax return is probably higher than that from the floor.
Tax return – another useful expression. That’s the form we all complete for the government that contains our financial information. Your accountant completed your tax return.
He was able to do it, so obviously he’s a pretty smart cookie.
A smart cookie. So you think he’s bright and intelligent.
I have… I really have, you know, no comment on him. People are saying ‘Is he sane?’ I have no idea.
Really?
When you look at other people’s tax return, even other wealthy people, their tax return is this thick. My tax return is this high.
Yeah, yeah, because you have a lot of income. Income – the money we make from our work or investments. If we receive more income – we pay more tax.
I think it’s very unfair.
But, before we pay our tax we can deduct our expenses – deduct – take away and expenses – the costs. The money we have to spend in order to earn money. We can deduct expenses.
Much, much more than people understand.
So you think we can deduct more money?
Well, I have a problem
What’s that?
I’m under audit.
Oh
I think it’s a very unfair thing because I have been under audit almost like, since I became famous. OK?
Well, let’s explain. An audit is when officials examine your financial records to see if they’re true and correct. Nobody wants to be audited.
I would much prefer them not to do that, that’s right.
Because of your deals with Russia?
The concept of Russia with respect to us is a total phony story.
So it’s not true. And you mean a totally phony.
Of course it’s a total phony story.
Totally phony. Totally phony. Well, thank you so much for talking to us, Mr. President. We’re really grateful to President Trump for talking to us this week. See you next Friday everyone. Bye.

Hi everyone. If you’d like more practice with words and expressions you heard in this video, we’ve made a free worksheet for you. I’ll put a link in the description below. If you liked this video, please, give it a thumbs up, and don’t forget to subscribe to our channel. Bye now and happy studying.

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Learn how to Ace an English Job Interview with an Expert

Learn how to Ace an English Job Interview with an Expert

In this English Show we talk about how to succeed in an job interview and we’re joined by Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat of the fabulous English with a Twist blog.

Hey. Come on everybody. It’s going to start.
Well, that’s true. Who did that?

Hello everybody. Welcome to The English Show. Welcome. I’m Vicki and I’m an English teacher. And with me is my good friend, Fluency MC. Hey, hey, hey. I’m Fluency. I’m also an English teacher and I’m a trainer and knowledge entertainer and welcome to another edition of The English Show. And the other person we want you to meet is the guy who’s making it all happen. Jay, are you there? Jay!
Hi everybody. I’m right here in the control room. I’m running the show. And I’m sure you’re going to enjoy all the things we have for you today.
Go Jay! Another person you’re going to meet later is Shanthi from English with a Twist. Our special guest! Yeah, and we’re going to learn about job interviews today, and how to ace an English job interview. What does it mean to “ace” an interview, Vicki? It means to be really successful at the interview so you get the job. Right. But first of all, I’d like to come to Paris. Oh, would you? Do you think Jay can bring you once again? Jay, do you think you can help me get to Paris today? Come visit me.

How am I getting to Paris this week Jay?
This week you’re going to swim there.
Oooh, that’s a long way to swim.
Yes, you’re going to need some help. Grab his tail.
Wow, I’m here. That was exciting.

Look, I made it, I’m here. Oh, Whoa. There she is again, everybody. Back in Paris. High five. High five. Vicki Hollett in Paris! Yeah. Wow, so is that the first time you’ve traveled by water? I think that’s the first time I’ve ever swum here. Yeah. I had to be… I had to be very energetic to get here. Was that a porpoise or a dolphin or…? I think it was a dolphin. Ah must be. And actually, we’re here with somebody very energetic who’s based in the UK. Shanti, are you there? Yes I am. I’m here. Hi everyone. Welcome to the English Show. It’s great to have you. Oh, it’s lovely to be here. Because we all want to know how we can ace a job interview. And we know that you’re going to be able to help us. Oh yes. That I can, indeed. Of course, one of the things you have to do is make a good first impression. Have you got any good tips for that?
When you arrive, have a nice smile, a firm handshake and be smart – well dressed, good haircut – nothing to strange, depending on the job you’re applying for. Ok, so smile, that’s an important one, isn’t it? Yes. And make sure you look smart. Yes, and also good eye contact. You know, look the person in the eye with a nice smile and a firm handshake please. None of the limp handshakes. That is terrible. I don’t know about you, but I just hate those. That’s true, isn’t it. A firm handshake suggests confidence. Indeed, yes, and it shows confidence and it shows that, you know, that you’re serious. OK. So, imagine that I’m at a job interview, and the interviewer asks me a question like “Can you tell me about yourself?” OK. It’s a very general question. What does it mean? You really do have to think hard. Because what they want you to do is briefly summarize who you are and what you’re experience is. And that’s basically what most interviewers are asking. Uh huh. There are some other tricky questions they might have too, like “What’s your proudest achievement?” You know, I always say to my clients you have to really think hard, because what the interviewer is asking you really is how you solved a problem. They want to see your problem solving skills and how you achieved that, not just the results. So, how you solved a a problem. But they’ll be interested in the results as well, perhaps. Oh yes. So what you’re doing is, you start off with what was the situation, then what you did to deal with that problem and then what were the results at the end. And, when you’re giving results, be specific. Give numbers. Quantify your achievement. Don’t just say ‘sales increased, you know we had a good sales outcome.’ They want to know by how many percent, by how much. What did you do? So, always give numbers. Be specific. Oh, so that’s another good tip for us. So, another tricky one… in fact, I can remember being asked this at a job interview… ‘What’s your greatest strength?’ That was all right. But then they said, “What’s your greatest weakness?” Yes. Always difficult, isnt’ it, because you don’t want to say too much about your weaknesses. But the key here really, is turning that weakness into a strength. One of the things about weakness is it’s demonstrating your self awareness. So, pinpoint an area. So for example, if you are someone who puts a lot of attention to detail, so you could be detail orientated. But, it could also be that you’re too concerned about details. So that particular job required you to complete it in a certain amount of time and you are focused on too much detail. That is a weakness. So then, what you want to do, is to show how you’ve overcome that weakness. You’re aware of it, so this is what you try and do. Maybe you set yourself some time lines. So that’s what they’re trying to look at also and how you’ve overcome that weakness. That’s interesting. So it’s not just a question of trying to find a weakness that isn’t really a weakness… you need to be honest. Yes. But you also need to tell them how you’ve overcome it and got round it. Have you got any weaknesses, Fluency? I sure do. Shanthi, it’s really interesting what you’re saying about different types of questions interviewers might ask that all connect to the idea of how you solve a problem. Because when you’re also… when you’re talking about a weakness that they might want to know about, you said ‘something you’re trying to overcome.’ So, it seems like problem solving skills – both at the job and also with yourself, your personality – kind of connect in a way. Yeah, I mean it is very much that, because what you’re looking at is also self awareness, self knowledge of your strengths and weaknesses. Because we’re all going to have that. One of the key things I always say when you’re applying for a job – look at the key skills they’re looking at in your job specification. And you’ve got to really think hard about what are the skills that you have where you are strong at and perhaps where you’re going to be a bit weaker. But then you’ve got to find a way to turn that round into a strength. That’s another good tip isn’t it? Very good, yeah. To make sure you study those job specifications so you can match what you’re saying to what they’re looking for. Yeah. People will see through waffe. And they will see see through – if you’re not being honest. Because what happens when we’re not being honest, we start waffling, we start talking too much, we start rambling, and we’re not focused. And an interviewer can see right through that. One of the other things I always say to my clients, particularly where they’re having an interview in English which is not their native language – is to not be afraid of pausing for a while. You know, we all get very nervous, we get get worried. And all of us do that. And then the tendency is to rush into the answer… with the answer. And what I always says is “…just give yourself a few seconds and you know pause and then answer the question.” It doesn’t show that, you know, you don’t have the answer but it just shows that you’re in control, um, of what you’re about to say. That’s another good tip, isn’t it? Yeah. I mean I… Don’t rush in. Yeah – you rushed in, Fluency. Ha ha ha ha. I was so excited that Shanthi started talking about when you’re not a native speaker since before that we hadn’t really talked about that. I mean that advice that we’re giving here – Shanthi’s giving is great for everybody – but it’s… when I work with students who are learning English, and you just prepare for job interivews, it’s even more important to be more prepared for the types of questions that will be asked, and also, as Shanthi said, to uh… it’s OK to pause and I want to ask, and I think you’ll agree Shanthi, it’s OK to ask to clarify the question and to be prepared with ways to ask “…do you mean that this” … or because that’s also a way to show that you’re solving a problem, trying to do something the right way as opposed to just pretending you understood. Yeah. That’s really important, isn’t it, to make sure you’ve understood the question. You don’t want to answer the wrong one. Absolutely, because actually it takes a lot of confidence say I didn’t quite get that – what you’re asking me is this… or maybe repeat that question so that it is down to the interviewer to confirm what they’ve just asked. Because sometimes they’re not that clear. Don’t put yourself at a lower level just because you are not a proficient speaker of English and assume that they they’re always right or they’re always clear. If you haven’t understood don’t make it “…I’m so sorry, I haven’t understood.” No. Turn it over to them to repeat their questions.

You know I often have that problem with you Jay.
With me?
Yeah, I ask one question and then you answer another.
I never do that!

I think that is selective hearing. You know, speaking of questions, I think it’s time for question Time. Question time everybody!
OK, we had a question from Nandish. Ah. And she asked about the difference between two words: achieve and accomplish. Ah I can see why. Well, they’re very similar, aren’t they?. Yeah, yeah. And I had to think about it and go check my answers. But what it’s about is ‘achieve’ is what we say when we’re thinking about the end result of something. So it’s very results oriented. ‘He achieved greatness and was awarded a Nobel Prize.’ But accomplish refers to the process of doing something – getting something done. So you’ve got achieve which is about the end result and you’ve got accomplish which is about the process. Right. So another example could be you can accomplish a lot without actually achieving your goal. Hmmm. Interesting. Yeah. Yeah. And of course in a job interview, they’re going to ask you about both, aren’t they? Yeah, what are your accomplishments? What have you achieved, yes. And it’s useful to know the difference. So you’re working a job and you have a sales target for the year. So that is your goal. That is your objective. You have to achieve that sales target. So in between that you have to do things. So you have to accomplish different tasks and jobs to get to that sales target. But sometimes you can do a lot of things so you can have accomplished them, but you don’t necessarily achieve that target. Excellent, yes, good example. Yeah. I’m ready for a conversation. What do you think? Is it time for ‘Conversation Time’?
I’m going to show you a business conversation today and I’m only going to show you the first half at first, and your task is to listen and to work out ‘What’s the conversation about?’, what are they discussing, and ‘What’s going to happen?’ So what it’s about – the topic – and then what’s going to happen next because you’re going to stop it. Is that right? That’s right. Are you ready? Ready.

We have big plans for you, Graham.
We’re going to give you a promotion.
You’re going to be our sales manager for all of Asia.

OK, so ‘We have big… What was the missing word? Plans. We have big plans for you Graham. We’re going to give you a… And the missing word was promotion. So a promotion is when you move up a level in your job. You’re going to be our… sales manager for all of Asia.
So did you get that Fluency? I did. It was really short, but I caught it. OK. What do you think is going to happen next? Hmmm. My guess is that Graham is going to jump for joy because he’s been wanting this promotion forever. Do you think that too, Shanthi? Erm, yes. It could be he does, or, I don’t know, he wasn’t looking terribly excited. So maybe he’s thinking Oooo. Maybe he wants to ask a few more questions. I don’t know. OK. Let me tell you. Shanthi. Yes, you’re right. What! Yes! Yes! And Fluency. Oh my god. Does Shanthi get special treatment? Is that…. Absolutely! Absolutely! Shall we look at it everybody?

We have big plans for you, Graham.
We’re going to give you a promotion.
You’re going to be our sales manager for all of Asia.
Gee, I’m sorry guys but I quit.
You’re resigning?
Yeah, I got a better job.But we had everything planned.
Wow! That came out of left field.

OK guys. So Shanthi, you were right. And in fact what he did was he quit. Quit is a very informal way of saying resign. In fact we’ve got resign coming up. ‘You’re resigning?’ ‘Yeah’, he said. ‘I’ve got a better job’. And then there’s a little idiom at the end. I don’t know if you caught it. ‘But we had everything planned.’ ‘Wow! That came out of left field’. Now that’s a baseball idiom. Fluency, you know much more about baseball than I do. What does ‘out of left field’ mean?
Well there are a few expressions with ‘left field’ in English because our image of left field in the baseball field, it’s like, really far away, over there. It’s the furthest point from where most of the action usually is. So it’s sort of that idea of out of nowhere. OK, so it’s sort of a surprise. Mmm. You don’t expect it because that’s not where the action usually is, so it’s unexpected. So there’s a little idiom for you. Out of left field means something that’s surprising – perhaps a bit of a shock. Mmm. It’s usually a bad surprise, isn’t it? So a shock. I’m curious. Is that idiom iused in British English? Even though you don’t have baseball. I know some baseball idioms are and some aren’t. No. No. We have some cricket idioms that are similar to baseball idioms. So another similar one would be, we can talk about a curve… a curved ball in British English. And that would be something that’s surprising. When somebody throws a ball and it moves in a way you don’t expect. And in American English I think you say ‘curve ball’. Yeah, but I thought some baseball idioms were also … just had gone into British even though there’s no baseball, but maybe I’m wrong. You’re right. There are a few. We do have a few. In fact we’ve made a whole series of baseball idiom videos. I was just thinking about that. Yeah, great videos so check them out. ‘Simple English Videos – Baseball Idioms’. That’s right. So Shanthi. Have you ever turned down a job offer?
When I was in finance, in the years before, erm… no, not that many. No, actually I don’t think I turned down job offers. But ever since becoming a Business English teacher, yes. Where people have offered me certain projects or jobs, then yes, I have turned them down. I’ve become more, more brave as I’ve got older – than when I was younger. I think sometimes people can forget this at a job interview. That it’s not just an opportunity for them to get to know you. But it’s also an opportunity for you, so that you can decide whether you really want the job. Yep, absolutely, and I think that’s really important and very much something that very few people do. Especially at the end, you know, when an interviewer asks, you know, do you have any questions for us, show that you are interested. You have actually done some research on the particular company. Oh good point. Mmm. The world of business can change very quickly so what you want to see is what is the time line for this particular new enterprise or this new project. Do they have a five year plan? You know, you want to dig in a bit more to find out what is their long terms strategy for that business, for your position. So that’s a great tip, isn’t it? To do some research beforehand so that you can ask deeper questions about what this job involves and where the company is going.
Can I add something here?
Yeah.
Another thing, I… I used to interview, I don’t know, sometimes ten or fifteen people a month when I was director of a program at a school in New York… a couple of different programs, but anyway… Err, and one of the reasons that I always liked when candidates were talking about how the job would help them, why they wanted the job, not just why they were great for us, is because I found that when… when people are more invested in how it’s going to, you know, make them better professionally and their life better, they’re more likely to stay and commit and work hard. Good point. Yeah.
Yeah. It also shows enthusiasm.
Now I have another question about… A different question they sometimes ask which is ‘Why do you want to leave your current job?’ That can sometimes be hard to answer.
Yes, it can be. And I think the key here is to stay positive, and show that you’re looking at… to progress your career. Even if your reality, say for example, you know, has been difficult or there have been changes in the structure in a company and you didn’t really like it, or morale was low, turn it round and say that, you know, I’ve achieved what I wanted to achieve in this particular role and there’s no more… there’s no way of progressing in my career, so I think it’s now time for a change and to look at something different. And so that’s what I want to do. So stay positive. Mmm. And focus on the future. Mmmm. If you can. Yes. Is that the tip? Yeah. That makes sense. Yeah, it’s a great way to connect… to connect to what I was saying before, I guess about why you want to work for them and what they can do for you at this point in your career.
Yes, absolutely because the world of work has changed hugely in the last ten to fifteen years, so of course we also have people who have been made redundant. And now you can see it as a bad situation and a… and a pesimistic situation, but I know a number of people, myself included, who… for them redundancy was the best thing that ever happened to them. We should talk about the phrase ‘make someone redundant’, which means, lay them off. OK. But it’s more… it’s more common in British than American English I think, isn’t it Fluency? Absolutely. We have ‘to lay someone off’ meaning we can’t use you or we don’t need you any more. And then we have ‘to fire someone’ which is when something… when the person has done something wrong or, you know, bad. That’s right. Now we say ‘fire’ in British English as well. Mmm. But in British English we can also say ‘to sack someone’. Right. And it means the same thing. Yeah. And that’s when they’ve made a mistake or they’ve done something wrong, as you said. And you also say ‘terminate’ don’t you Fluency? Yeah, that’s more the official terminology. So if we’re talking about ‘I got fired from my job’, we wouldn’t normally say ‘I got terminated’. Certainly the verb ‘to fire’ is not used so much in official language in a company. ‘To terminate’ sounds really funny in British English. We think of Arnold Schwarzenegger and the terminator. I know, it sounds so brutal too, doesn’t it? ‘I terminate you!’ Really? What did I do that was so terrible?
OK guys. I think we’re ready for a game. Always ready for a game. Let’s go! Let’s play!
Hey, we’ve got a great game today, haven’t we? Oh yeah, this one is going to be a lot of fun. OK, so here’s how it works. We’r going to interview one another for a job, but the person who is being interviewed won’t know what the job is. So they’ll have to answer the questions and try and get the job, but they won’t actually know what it is they’re being interviewed for. That’s right and I’ve got… Shanthi and I have a job we’re going to interview you for, and you have something you’re interviewing Shanthi for. Is that right? That’s right and we’ve also got a job that we’re going to interview you for, Fluency. Ooo! Yes. Really? I didn’t know that. Oh good. Yeah. Oh yeah. So shall we show everyone what the job is. Fluency, you can’t look. All right. OK. Close your eyes Fluency. We’re starting with me and I can’t look. OK. Yep. Close your eyes. I’m covering my eyes. OK. So everybody’s seen it now. You can look back. OK. All right? So Fluency, we have some questions for you. Oh, thank you so much for the opportunity to interview with you. OK, well, first question for you is: what would you say your greatest strength is? What sort of personal qualities have you go that will be good for this job? Well, let’s see. I love working with different types of people and leearning new things from them. I work really well as part of a team. So I think that’s an important quality I have. Good good. How important are qualities like honesty to you? Oooo. I think honesty, and reliablity, and loyalty – these are very important. You haven’t mentioned anything about leadership or communication skills. Ah, well, erm… Well, part of why I think I’m really good working with different types of people is that I think I’m good at communicating with people. Listening – I’m a great listener, but also I think I’m patient and can explain things to people I work with. And then leadership. I love leading projects but I’m also happy to be led – to be part of a group that has a leader, so I think I have both qualities. Leadership qualities but also working well on a team with a leader. Uhuh. Erm, that sounds quite good doesn’t it, Shanthi? Yeah, I think so. Yeah. Not bad. I wanted to ask you another question, Fluency. Erm, what sort of experience have you had in negotiating? Are you good at negotiating? Yeah, I think so. I mean to be honset, not too much experience, but again I thnk it’s back to communication. I think with that skill I can build on my experience as a negotiator. Uhuh. So tell me about your free time interests. What do you like doing that perhaps connects with this job? Oh well. Let’s see. Uh, I love reading and doing research. I love cooking, of course. I think that would be… it’s a free time activity but you know, you can see the connection…. Cooking? …I’m sure with the job there. And music is a big interest of mine. And I think there’s a nice, you know, er… synergy with… with making music and with the work I’d be doing for your company. So… Uhuh. And what about beauty pageants? Well, I was Miss North Carolina, but that was years ago. No. Beauty pageants, let’s see. Erm. Well, not so much. No, I have to say, no. And do you watch a lot of television? Oh, well these days more YouTube actually. That doesn’t really count, does it? Oh, I don’t know, what do you think, Shanthi? Well, it could be. It’s another form of social media. But, speaking of social media, what other forms of social media do you like? For example, do you like to tweet? Do you use Twitter? Twitter’s OK but I’m more of a Facebook-Instagram guy. But if you need some one to.. to do Twitter, I do use it and I think I could get better and better at Twitter, I’m sure. Do you have many followers? Mmmm. Sure, oh yeah, absolutely. I think my neighbor, on my street. Let’s see, I think my son’s teacher. And then a few other people. Family mostly. What do you think Shanthi? Shall we give him the job? Oooo. I think he’s going to have to increase his er… his use of Twitter. Erm, because for this job he’s definitely going to need to tweet a lot more. And he’s going to need to increase his number of followers. Erm, I don’t know. Well, I think we could give him a go. Let him have a go at this. I don’t think he could do worse than the present one. He can’t, no, nobody can do worse than him. Fluency, what job do you think we’re interviewing you for. Err, I can guess this one for sure because these are the questions that you would only ask if you’re trying to find the best Presidents of the United States. Woohoo! That’s exactly right. Bravo! You asked all the right questions. OK, I think Shanthi’s might be a little bit harder. Shall we interview Shanthi now? Yes, let’s go. So Shanthi, I wanted to start by asking you about your experience, and thye training that you’ve had for this job. OK, so I graduated from university and I got a degree in politics and international studies. And I’ve had twenty years in the finance world. So my qualifications and experience has been in investment management and in finance. And then I changed career and then I came into Business English teaching. So banking and finance is her background Fluency. Yeah. I mean I’ve heard of career changes but erm… This is quite unusual. Erm, what about manual dexterity? Yeah, could I ask her a question about that? Yeah. Yeah, so, so, how… are you good… good with your hands? Erm, I mean all this finance stuff, it’s very interesting, but yeah, like Vicki was saying, manual dexterity. It’s really important how well you can, you know how precise and how comfortable you are using your hands. Oh, OK. Well. I’m good at knitting and crocheting. Wow! And yeah, you know, I use my hands well. That’s a pretty big leap from knitting to what we’d have in mind for you in this position. Erm. Yeah. Right Vicki? Yeah, I’m surprised by that, but maybe you’re really good with modern technology. Ah, that’s important, yeah. Well, yeah, I’ve had to learn a lot in the last few years, especially, you know, the different apps and what to do. Apps? Yeah. yeah. Well it sounds like you’re someone who likes to jump in and experiment then? Yeah, I don’t mind trying things out, so I’ll jump in a try something out. OK, so you’re not particularly cautious. You prefer to take risks. Mmm. But it all depends. I mean, physical risk, if it’s going to hurt me, then no, I’m not very good at that. But if it’s a business risk, then I don’t mind too much. Well actually we’re more worried about whether it’s going to hurt the other person. That’s right. Yeah. Am I … Am I apply for a job to be a wrester or something? Vicki do you want to tell her. I think we should tell her, don’t you? You’re applying for a job to be a brain surgeon. Obviously. A brain surgeon? We were surprised by your training. Yeah, you might want to shelve some of that finance interest for a little bit. A brain surgeon? Oh I get it. Manual dexterity. Yeah, we were impressed by your knitting skills, but we’d have prefered to hear sewing, I think. Yeah, the knitting could lead to sewing. I’m not sure if sewing could lead to surgery though. So hit the street. It’s a definite no. Yeah, no that was totally way way off. OK, do you want to interview me now and see if I can get a job? Yeah, I’d love to. I’ve got time because I have almost four years until I need to start my new job as President. So er…

Yeah, Shanthi and I have some questions for you, Vicki. Erm, Shanthi, do you want to begin? Yeah. OK. So Vicki, we’d like to know if you prefer to work on your own or do you like to work in a team? I love to work in a team. I really enjoy working with lots and lots of people. Hmm. Oh. OK, so should you have moments when you have to work on your own, would that be a problem? Oh no. I could perhaps work on my own for a little while. Because independent work is very important in this position. Oh, Oh I’m a very sort of independent person actually. OK. Good. Erm… how about travel. I mean would you be OK being away from home for, I don’t know, maybe a week at a time – maybe even a little bit longer? Oh, I love travelling. In fact I love going to different countries. I hope it involves foreign travel. Not so much actually. Ah. OK. Mmm. Maybe it could become an international job in the future. That’s what I’m hoping. Or Maybe not. Shanthi, your turn to ask a question. Err, OK I would like to know, in terms of your time keeping, are you usually on time? Oh erm, I’m very very punctual. In fact normally I arrive ten minutes early for every event. Interesting. Wow! OK, and this is also with traffic? Erm, well, I don’t drive any more these days. Uhuh. But I take Ubers a lot. Shanthi, would Ubers work for this position? I don’t know. It’s going to be a bit difficult, isn’t it Fluency? Just a little bit. Err, you know, my next question Vicki – it’s, it’s very interesting to us that you don’t drive. You know I was going to ask, if you have a clean driving record. Because that’s actually… Well I do have a licence. And I have a clean driving licence. It’s just because I live in the centre of the city, I haven’t driven for a few years. Is it because you don’t like driving? Erm, well it’s very busy. The traffic’s very bad in the city centre and I can walk everywhere.
Aha! So when you’re out of the city, how do you like to travel? How do you travel normally, once you get out? I love boats. I love planes. Flying is great. Hmm. Wow! Uhuh, Uhuh. Shanthi, I think there may be some challenges for Vicki in this position. One more question I have Vicki is how… how is your endurance? I mean can you work for a long period of time without a break? When I get interested in a task, I like to work all night on it. Oh wow! That’s good. So what do you think? Have I got the job? That’s a tough one because – Shanthi, here’s what I think… I think that… What was the job? One second. What we just found out about you Vicki is really important. The endurance but no driving licence. Oh you say driving licence, by the way and in the States we say driver’s license. Just something for everyone to know out there. What do you think, Shanthi? Good point. You know Vicki, you wouldn’t be right for this job. Oh no! I’m so sorry. So what job have I missed out on? Tell me! Well, driving an eighteen wheeler. A truck driver, of course. You were going to be a truck driver. Oh a truck driver! Do you know, I might actually like that job, because you get to see America, don’t you? That’s true, but unfortunately you chose to tell us about your love for walking and boats and planes and pretty much every mode of transportation you could think of besides a truck – which is not so good when you’re interviewing for the job of truck driver. Ah. And you wanted to go abroad. You wanted to do international travel. Ah, I’m going to have to give myself a mark here. Finally! Boing for Vicki. It’s about time. OK, I think we should stop playing this stupid game and have a rap. Let’s do it! Oooo! Let’s do it! Cool!
Once again it’s Fluency MC, Flu, Flu, Fluency MC. Once again it’s Fluency MC. Grammar though lyrics, kick it! Ha! Yeah! Well, I want to tell you about the rap for today. But first I want to quickly explain, in case we have any new viewers for the English Show today, why we do raps on the English Show. So, I like to write short raps using rhyme and rhythm to give you practice with the vocabulary and the grammar structiures that we’ve included in different segments of the show. So I made a rap for today and Vicki made a video. WE’re going to show you the video so you can watch, read and listen. We’ll have the lyrics there. Then we’re going to practice together and Shanthi, will you practice with us. Yes, of course. Can’t wait. Excellent. And then what we’ll do is show the video again. And of course you can watch this English Show program and all the English Show programs multiple times to keep practising, because these raps really can help your pronunciation, your listening skills, and most importantly, help you remember the great vocabulary and structures that we talked about today on the English Show. So, Jay! Could you roll the video?

Good morning! Thank you for coming in for this interview today.
I’ve just had a look at your resume.
What are your greatest strengths?
How about your long-term objectives?
Why do you want to work for our company?
In what ways would you be effective?
What gives you the most satisfaction?
What are you passionate about? Do you work well on a team?
Absolutely, without a doubt!
I achieved a lot at my last job, but I recently resigned.
I have big plans for the future, you know.
Well, thank you for your time.
We appreciate your coming in and we’ll be in touch soon.
Thank you for this opportunity. I look forward to hearing from you.

All right. Cool, very good. Great. I love the video Vicki, thanks for that. It was fun to make. So there’s vocabulary and grammar structures that I hope you remember from earlier in the show. So things like ‘resigned’ and we talked about ‘achieving’ versus accomplishing. And I also put in some other vocabulary that I think is very common in job interviews so I focused a lot on the questions the interviewer asks, as you can see, not so much on the answers to the questions. And it might seem a little fast so we’re going to do it slower but with the same rhythm, because the rhythm here is the natural rhythm of conversation. So Shanthi, if you will repeat after me for this practice? And everybody out there in the audience, please do the same. Shanthi, ready to go? Yes, I am. Ready everybody?
Let’s go like this.
Good morning! Thank you for coming in for this interview today.
Good morning! Thank you for coming in for this interview today.
Good. I’ve just had a look at your resume.
I’ve just had a look at your resume.
Good. In the United States we usually say resume. Er, resume. Other places sometimes, cv. I say cv. Yes, cv for sure. Curriculum vitae. Yeah.
What are your greatest strengths?
What are your greatest strengths?
How about your long-term objectives?
How about your long-term objectives?
Why do you want to work for our company?
Why do you want to work for our company?
In what ways would you be effective?
In what ways would you be effective?
What gives you the most satisfaction?
What gives you the most satisfaction?
What are you passionate about?
What are you passionate about?
Do you work well on a team?
Do you work well on a team?
Absolutely, without a doubt!
Absolutely, without a doubt!
Good, notice we say ‘on a team’ usually in American English, but British? ‘In a team.’ Yeah, yeah. I was going to correct you then! Aha! All right let’s continue. I achieved a lot at my last job.
I achieved a lot at my last job.
But I recently resigned.
But I recently resigned.
I have big plans for the future, you know.
I have big plans for the future, you know.
Well, thank you for your time.
Well, thank you for your time.
We appreciate your coming in.
We appreciate your coming in.
And we’ll be in touch soon.
And we’ll be in touch soon.
Thank you for this opportunity.
I look forward to hearing from you.
I look forward to hearing from you.
Very good. One more thing I wanted to mention, because some of you might be wondering, ‘we appreciate your coming in’. In more formal English in American English (I’ll ask you two in a moment about British) we would use the possessive pronoun here – your coming in. But in everyday conversation in American English, we don’t use this so much. ‘We appreciate you coming in’ but in a more formal context it would be ‘your. How about in British? Oh same thing in British. Although I have to say when I saw it I thought mmm. Because I’m so used to hearing it in the informal way. Great, well thanks Shanthi, and thanks to all of you for practicing. As you see we slowed it down, but I hope when you’re watching the video, you’ll notice that the rhythm is the same, so for example, we said, erm, ‘how about your long term objectives?’. In the video it’s more ‘how-about-your…’ Right? But the idea is to get practice with it more slowly, really focusing on it as we did. And then also to get listening practice and then when you’re ready, also speaking practice by rapping along with the video. So can we check out the video again, Jay?

Good morning! Thank you for coming in for this interview today.
I’ve just had a look at your resume.
What are your greatest strengths?
How about your long-term objectives?
Why do you want to work for our company?
In what ways would you be effective?
What gives you the most satisfaction?
What are you passionate about? Do you work well on a team?
Absolutely, without a doubt!
I achieved a lot at my last job, but I recently resigned.
I have big plans for the future, you know.
Well, thank you for your time.
We appreciate your coming in and we’ll be in touch soon.
Thank you for this opportunity. I look forward to hearing from you.

That was great. Well, thank you. Great video for the rap and I hope everybody enjoyed it. I hope that everybody who is applying for a job and has an interview coming up, gets that job. Good luck. Yes! Good luck! Hopefully you’ll know before the interview what the job is for. That definitely helps you prepare. And I want to say thank you to Shanthi for all the great tips she’s given us about interviews today. Thank you Shanthi. Thank you very much it was a pleasure. Listen. If people want to stay in touch with you, or get in touch with you, or follow you, what can they do? Well, what they could do is they can have a look at my website: English with a Twist dot com, sign up to my free e-guide where they… and they sign up to my blog, and that way I deliver weekly lessons every Friday, which is specifically for Business English. And they also get a free e-guide on the ten ways to communicate better and more effectively in business with English. Now the other thing is you’ve actually written a book about interviews – English job interviews, haven’t you? Yes, I have. It’s part of my book called Business English Secrets. And one section of it is dedicated to job interviews, but it also covers other areas like presentations, and also writing skills, and small talk – which are the key skills that a lot of my clients have, you know, asked me to cover and where I’ve coached them. And job interviews is a big section of that. Yes. Fantastic! Great. And erm… if you want to follow us, and I hope you do, then how can they follow us on ‘The English Show’ Fluency? Well, it’s really easy because you can look in the description box below for all the information. Definitely our YouTube channels: Fluency MC and Simple English Videos, and also to be on our mailing lists to get information from us. You can do that by going to our websites. So I think all we need to do now is say goodbye to everybody, but first, good-bye to you Jay and thank you for your help today. Thanks so much Jay. It’s been my great pleasure. I’ve had a lot of fun. I hope you have. It was great to see you Shanthi. And we’ll see you in the next show! Goodbye then everybody. Bye. See you soon. Bye-bye. Bye.

How to Check In at an Airport and Answer Security Questions in English

How to Check In at an Airport and Answer Security Questions in English

Learn the English phrases you need to check in at an airport in this video, including security questions and how to answer them.

We made this video with our friend Rachel of Rachel’s English. She has a terrific website and YouTube channel on American English pronunciation.  

Click here to find lots more practical videos for everyday situations.
Click here to learn how to use the words Travel, Trip and Journey.

Airport Check in English Video Script

This bag’s too big for carry on
Well yes.
Where’s the check in desk?
I think we have to use the machines.
The machines? I hate the machines.
It’s not working
Let’s go to the check in desk.

We’re going flying in today’s lesson and we have a very special guest. Rachel of the wonderfulo Rachel’s English channel is here to help us. If you haven’t subscribed to Rachel’s YouTube channel yet, do it right away. It’s the best place to improve your pronunciation. OK, let’s check in for our flight.

Good afternoon
Hi. Hi, we need to check in.
The machine didn’t recognize my passport.
I can help. Where are you flying to today?
Rio Recife
We’re flying to Rio and then we have a connecting flight to Recife.
What are you looking for?
My reading glasses.
They’re on your head.
Oh. I had a bottle of water.
I threw that away. Why? You can’t take liquids on the plane.
Are you checking any bags?
Yes, just one
Can you put it on the scale?
Sure. Did you pack my gloves?
Gloves?
Well it could be cold.
No, it’s summer in Recife.
Oh, of course. Can you check our bag through to Recife?
No, I can’t. You’ll need to pick it up in Rio to go through customs.
And then we have to check it in again for Recife?
That’s right
How much time do we have? How long is our layover?
About two and a half hours.
That’s plenty of time.
I need to ask you some security questions. Who packed your bags?
Me. Me. We both did
When did you pack it?
Last night.
And has it been with you since you packed it?
Yes. Yes.
And are you carrying anything for anybody else?
No. No.
Great. Here are your boarding passes. Thank you.
Your flight leaves from gate 19 and boarding begins at 11:20.
11.20. Yes. Your seat numbers are 16E and 16F.
Do we have an aisle seat?
Yes, you have an aisle seat and a middle seat.
And how do we get to the gate?
You follow the signs to Departures
OK. Thank you very much.
Have a great trip. We will.
I’ve got another security question.
What?
Did we lock the front door?

Let’s look at some language again. Passengers often check in at machines that print their boarding passes – the document they need to get on a flight.
Passengers can take small bags onto the plane with them as carryon luggage – but not big ones.

This bag’s too big for carry on. Well yes.

Large bags must be checked in.

Are you checking any bags?
Yes, just one
Can you put it on the scale?
Sure.

Bags are usually checked through to the final destination, but not always.

Can you check our bags through to Recife?
No, I can’t. You’ll need to pick it up in Rio to go through customs.
And then we have to check it in again for Recife?
That’s right

We had connecting flights with a layover. A layover is a short stay between parts of a journey.

How much time do we have? How long is our layover?
About two and a half hours.
That’s plenty of time.

The check in clerk asks security questions. They could be WH- questions, so questions that begin with words like these.

I need to ask you some security questions. Who packed your bag?
Me. Me.

Who packed your bag?
When did you pack it?
Where was it packed?

Other times they ask questions you need to answer yes or no.

Has your bag been with you since you packed it?
Yes
Are you carrying anything for anyone else?
No.

Listen carefully. Here are some more questions you’ll need to answer ‘no’.

Has your bag been out of your sight at any time?
Does it contain any prohibited or dangerous articles?
Are you carrying anything for anyone else?
Has anyone given you anything to carry for them on this flight?

She told us the gate number. A gate is the place where passengers wait to get on their flight.

Your flight leaves from gate 19 and boarding begins at 11:20.

The boarding time is the time passengers start getting onto the plane.

Do we have an aisle seat?
Yes, you have an aisle seat and a middle seat.

We will have an aisle seat and a middle seat. We won’t have a window seat. But first we need to go to departures.

And how do we get to the gate?
You follow the signs to Departures
OK. Thank you very much.
Have a great trip.
We will.

And that’s it. Now you’re ready for your flight!
Make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel and to Rachel’s channel too. Together we’re going to help your English take off.

Click here to find lots more practical videos for everyday situations.
Click here to learn how to use the words Travel, Trip and Journey.

How to Leave a Voicemail in English

How to Leave a Voicemail in English

Do you know how to leave a voicemail in English? Here’s a collaboration video we made with four great YouTube teachers. You’ll find lots of useful expressions you can use when you need to leave an English voice message for somebody.

Hello. This is Vicki. Sorry I missed your call. Please leave a message!
Hey Vicki. It’s Jennifer. I have a great idea for a video. It involves group collaboration. Do you have time to talk later today? Give me a call when you can, okay? Just in case, I’ll send you an email, too. Thanks. Bye.

When you’re creating your outgoing voicemail message, begin by saying ‘hello’. Then either state your name or your phone number. For example, ‘Hello, you’ve reached Gaby.’ or ‘Hello, you’ve reached 555-1234.’ Then you can leave instructions for the caller, say ‘thank you’ and ‘goodbye’. So for example, Hello, you’ve reached Gabby. Please leave me a message and I’ll call you back as soon as possible. Thank you. Bye’

Hello. This is Jennifer. I’m sorry I’m not able to take your call. Please leave your name and number, and I’ll get back to you as soon as I can. Thank you.
Hi Jennifer. It’s Vicki returning your call. I guess we’re playing phone tag. But I got your email, and I love your idea and I’ll be happy to contact the others. I’ll see who I can reach today. Talk later. Bye!

When you leave a message, first say hello. ‘Hi’ is okay for friends, family and co-workers. Then state your name. Identify yourself if necessary, for example, do you represent a company? Or are you a friend of a friend? Then state the purpose of your call. Be brief.

Hi. This is Jason Levine. I’m sorry I’m not available to take your call. Please leave a message, and I’ll get back to you as soon as I can.
Hey Jase. It’s Vicki, calling about Jennifer’s idea for a video. Did you get the email? Call me back when you get a chance, all right? Oh, and could you reach out to Gabby? You have her number, right? Thanks. Bye.
Hello. You’ve reached Gabby. I can’t take your call right now, but please leave me a message and I’ll call you back as soon as I can. Thank you. Bye!
Hi Gabby! It’s Jase. We’re getting a group together for a collaboration video. It’s going to be me, Vicki of Simple English Videos, and JenniferESL. We’d love to have you join. Give me call if you’re interested. Hope to hear back from you soon. Bye.
Hi Gabby. It’s Jase again. You’re in touch with Minoo from Anglo Link, right? We’d love to have Minoo join, too. Do you think you could call her and ask? Thanks! Bye.

When you leave voicemail, you can add a call back number. Your best friend will have your phone number, but a new client won’t. You can also state the times you’re available. For example, ‘You can call me anytime today until 5 o’clock.’ Remember adding a ‘Thank you!’ or a simple ‘Thanks’ is a good thing to do before you say bye.

Hello. This is Minoo. I’m not able to answer your call right now. Please leave your name and number, and I’ll return your call as soon as possible. Thank you!
Hello Minoo. This is Gabby from Go Natural English. I’m calling because a group of us online English teachers are getting together to do a collaborative project and I was wondering if you’d have time to talk. Could you give me a call back at 1-312-555-1234? I’ll look forward to speaking with you soon. Thanks so much. Bye for now.

Remember to be brief and speak clearly especially when you’re spelling a name, stating your phone number, or giving an email address. You might even want to say it twice: the first time, slowly and the second time, a bit faster.

Hi Jennifer. This is Minoo. I just spoke to Gabby and she told me about the group collaboration video. I’m really happy you all reached out. I’d love to join the group. Why don’t we continue through email? My address is minoo.101@hotmail.com. Thanks a lot a Jennifer! Talk to you soon. Bye.

Let’s review some of the vocabulary you’ve heard. Minoo gave some excellent advice.

Be brief.

What does brief mean? Short. So don’t talk too long. Now what about this word?

Hi, this is Jason. I’m sorry I’m not available to take your call.

If you’re available, you’re free to see or talk to someone. And if you’re not available, you’re out or busy. And one more. You’re intouch with Minoo from Anglo Link, right? If you’re in touch with someone, you’re communicating with them, maybe by email, but usually by phone.

Hi everyone! Thanks again for putting a great lesson together. I think we gave a lot of useful examples for leaving voicemail. There’s only one thing left to do. Let’s say thank you and bye to our viewers. Bye. Thank you.

Make sure you subscribe to all our channels so you don’t miss any of our videos.

Click here to see another collaboration video we made about lying.
Click here to see more business English videos.
To learn more from: JenniferESL, Gabby of Go Natural English, Minoo of Anglo Link, and Fluency MC (Jason Levine), make sure you subscribe to everyone’s channels:

Jennifer
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Website: http://www.englishwithjennifer.com/
Blog for teachers: https://englishwithjennifer.wordpress.com/
Gabby
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How to answer English calls when you’re busy – funny

How to answer English calls when you’re busy – funny

Telephone English is just like normal English with a few special phrases, but many learners find English calls stressful. Watch this funny English telephone conversation with Barack Obama and you’ll learn some practical expressions you can put to use in your conversations. You’ll have fun along the way.

Learn more useful expressions for everyday situations. Click here. 

Obama telephone conversation tapescript

Two for you. Two for me. Two for you. Hi, this is Vicki.
This is Barack Obama.
Barack who? This is Barack Obama.
How are you?
Fine, how are you? Well, I’m doing great and er…
I know I’m interrupting but I figured you might take my call.
Well, we’re a bit busy. How’s er… How’s your Mom doing these days?
Mum’s fine. Was there something you wanted?
One of the things I think is… is terrific is baseball, you know.
Baseball. So you called to talk about baseball?
Right, you know, I’m a big baseball fan. Er… And I grew up in Hawaii. My earliest memories of baseball were actually the…
Look I’m sorry Barack but we’re a bit busy at the moment. Is that er… Is that correct?
Yeah, this isn’t a good time. Well then I understand that… I understand that…
Try calling next week, or next month. We’d love to hear from you then.
Well I appreciate that. Tell your Mom I said ‘Hi’. You take care of yourself.
You too. Thanks Barack. Bye.
So where were we? Er, two for you. Two for me. Two for you. Two for me…

Click here to watch this video with a clickable transcript

Learn more useful expressions for everyday situations. Click here. 

How to Sell in English: Features and Benefits

How to Sell in English: Features and Benefits

Do you need to know how to sell in English? Then this English sales training video is for you.

When you want to describe your product or idea, you need to describe its features.
But if you want to sell your product or idea, you’re going to need to explain its benefits – the things that will make your customers want to buy.

We can help you. We’ll show you how to turn features into benefits and give you useful phrases to help you persuade in English – English phrases for selling.


Click here to learn useful English phrases for managing discussions in business meetings.
Click here if you’d like to see more of our business English videos.

How to sell in English

It’s my first day as a salesman. I wish Vicki were here.
Don’t worry, I am here.
Good. I’m a little nervous.
You’re going to be great. I’ve got my magic wand so I can help you.
You’ll be here if I need you?
Yes. I’ll just be invisible. Oh look, here comes a customer.
In this lesson you’re going to learn some useful English phrases for talking about products along with some great phrases for selling.
And you’re also going to learn some phrases for persuading people and selling your ideas.
Where did Vicki go? Oh, good morning. Can I interest you in our product?
I don’t know. What is it?
It’s a lighter.
I see.
It contains flammable gas.
Well, it’s a lighter. Of course it does.
It’s 12 inches long. I can see that.
And it’s red.
I don’t think I like the colour.
Vicki! Vicki, it’s not going well.
That’s because you’re just talking about the features. Tell her about the benefits.
The benefits?
Yes. How is it going to make her life better?
Oh I see.
And don’t forget to let her try it. Have another go.
Good morning. I have a product that will make your life easier.
Really? What’s that?
You can throw away your matches and use this to light all your candles, fires and grills.
Oh it’s a lighter.
This long pipe keeps your hand away from the flame so you never get burned.
I like that. I’m not sure about the colour though.
It’s bright red so it’s easy to find in the kitchen drawer.
Well, that makes sense.
Try it.
It doesn’t work.
No, it does. Pull hard.
It’s very stiff.
It has a safety catch. Would you like to buy it?
No, I don’t think so.
It’s too difficult to operate.
We sold half a million last year.
Thanks all the same.
It’s only ten dollars. Vicki!
It’s OK, don’t panic. You were doing well. You just need to explain how it works and tell her the benefits.
The benefits. Yes, that safety catch is a great feature, and it’s a terrific price.
OK.
Try again.
Do you want to try it?
Yes please.
Now pull very hard. It’s stiff because there’s a safety catch.
Yes, it is very stiff.
That’s a special feature. It means you don’t have to worry about children playing with it.
It’s childproof.
Exactly.
That’s very good. How much is it?
Just $10, so you can afford to buy one for all your friends and family.
Hmmm.
People often give them as gifts because they’re so useful.
I need to get some Christmas presents.
We sold half a million last year.
OK, I’ll take twenty.
Sure.
Would you like to pay by cash or credit card? Thanks Vicki!

So Jay got the sale! Now did you understand everything they said? Let’s check some vocabulary.

It contains flammable gas.
Well, it’s a lighter. Of course it does.

Flammable means easy to burn and set on fire. And what about inflammable? Does it mean the opposite? No!
Inflammable means the same as flammable. Sometimes English is so confusing. OK. Let’s look at the word ‘light’ .

You can throw away your matches and use this to light all your candles, fires and grills.
Oh, it’s a lighter.”

‘Light’ is a verb here. It means make something start to burn. We can light fires, grills, cigarettes and candles.
Notice we don’t set fire to them. We light them. We only set fire to things when we want to destroy them. OK, two more words.

It is very stiff.
That’s a special feature. It means you don’t have to worry about children playing with it.
It’s child proof.
Exactly.

If something is stiff, it’s difficult to move. And if something is childproof, it’s designed so that young children can’t open or use it.
Lids on medicine bottles are stiff so they’re childproof.
Great. Now let’s look at some phrases you can use to sell products.

It’s 12 inches long.

Features are facts that describe a product and say what’s special about it. But if you want to sell the product, you probably need to talk about its benefits.

This long pipe keeps your hand away from the flame so you never get burned.

Benefits are things that make our lives better. Let’s look at some more.

It’s bright red. It’s easy to find in the kitchen drawer.

Benefits are things that make life easier.

It has a safety catch. You don’t have to worry about children playing with it.

Benefits are also things that make life more pleasant and worry-free.

It costs ten dollars. You can afford to buy one for all your family and friends.

So notice these phrases. They’re are useful when you’re selling a product, and they’re also useful for selling your ideas. When you want to persuade someone to do something, talk about its benefits. Tell them the good things that will be possible.
You can also use these phrases to tell them how your ideas will make their life better.

You know this lighter has another feature.
What’s that?
A flame adjuster switch.
What’s the benefit of that?
Well, when you’re lighting birthday candles, you just want a little flame. But when you’re lighting the grill you want a big one.

Click here to watch this video with a clickable transcript
Click here to learn useful English phrases for managing discussions in business meetings.
Click here if you’d like to see more of our business English videos.

Not interested – it means I don’t want it

Not interested – it means I don’t want it

If someone is trying to sell us something and we don’t want to buy it, we can explain we’re not interested. It’s another way of saying ‘I don’t want it’ in English. It’s just a little more polite and businesslike. You can see how we use the phrase in two different English conversations here.

Conversation 1

This is our first new product. What do you think?
No, sorry. Not interested.
OK, we also have this. No, not interested.
How about this?
No, he’s definitely not interested. Do you have any balls?
What?

Conversation 2

I’ll offer you two a business proposition.
We’re not interested.
Well, you’ll be interested. Now, you’re a smart young man.
Don’t listen to him, Bruce.

Click here to learn the difference in meaning between the adjectives interesting and interested.
Click here see more English conversations for speaking practice.

Trying to Learn to Touch Type – An English Conversation

Trying to Learn to Touch Type – An English Conversation

Vicki is trying to learn to touch type so she is trying not to look at the keys. In this funny English conversation, Jay is surprised to see that she has covered her fingers with stickie notes.

Trying to learn conversation

What are you doing?
Oh, I’m trying to learn to touch type.
But what are all the stickie notes for?
Oh, I’m trying not to look at the keys.
Good luck with that.

Click here to learn the difference between ‘try to do’ and ‘try doing’.

Click here to see more conversation videos for English speaking practice.