27 British and American Word Differences

Is it zip or zipper? Buggy or stroller? You loved our last video on British and American word differences so Super Agent Awesome made another one with us.
In this video look at differences like hood/bonnet and trunk/boot and say what we’d call them in British and American English.
Some of the other words we explore in this video include bangs and fringe, vest and waistcoat, shopping cart and trolley, and checkers and draughts.

We have other kinds of videos that compare British and American English that you might enjoy. Click here to see more.

Tell me about that lady’s hair.
She has bangs.
And I’d say she has a fringe.
English is a strange language.
Bangs.
Fringe.
You liked our last video about British and American words so Super Agent Awesome is back with me again….
Yeah!
… to make another one.
Yeah!
Now, here’s a car and what’s this bit at the front?
Oh, it’s called a hood.
And I’d call it a bonnet. Bonnet is also a word for a fancy ladies hat. And in the back of the car…
Oh it’s … we call it a trunk.
And I’d call it a boot.
Hood.
Bonnet.
Trunk.
Boot.
Where do you put cars while you’re going shopping?
Ah, you put it in the parking lot.
And I would put it in a car park. And where do you store them at home?
Uh, at the garage.
And I’d say garage.
Parking lot.
Car park.
Garage.
Garage.
What’s this?
Zippers.
And we’d call them zips.
Zips?
She’s wearing a red sweater.
We often say jumper.
Really?
Yeah.
Zippers.
Zips.
Sweater.
Jumper
That’s a baked potato.
And we’d call it a jacket potato.
Mmhmm. And what’s that?
That’s a jacket.
This kind of jacket we often call an anorak.
Baked potato
Jacket potato.
Jacket
Anorak.
This is called an undershirt.
Ok, and I’d call it a vest.
Wow.
What do you call that?
I call that a vest.
OK, and I’d call it a waistcoat.
How crazy!
Undershirt.
Vest.
Vest.
Waistcoat.
What’s that?
That’s a trailer.
And in the UK we’d call it a caravan.
Ooh, a truck.
This is a lorry.
It’s a shopping cart.
And we’d say trolley.
That rhymed.
Trailer.
Caravan.
Truck.
Lorry.
Shopping cart.
Shopping trolley.
Tic-tac-toe.
And I’d call it noughts and crosses.
Chutes and ladders.
Ok, and in the UK we’d call it snakes and ladders.
Uh, I think that is checkers.
We’d call it draughts.
Tic-tac-toe.
Noughts and crosses.
Chutes and ladders.
Snakes and ladders.
Checkers
Draughts.
This is a gymnast, and do you know what equipment she’s working on.
Uh, she’s using the uneven bars.
And we’d call them the asymmetric bars.
What’s asymmetric?
It means that it’s not symmetrical.
Uneven bars.
Asymmetric bars.
That’s a vacuum bottle.
And we’d call it a vacuum flask.
Oh, um.
Would you call it…
…a closet.
And we’d probably call that a wardrobe.
Vacuum bottle.
Vacuum flask.
Closet.
Wardrobe.
And what’s he playing?
He’s playing soccer.
And I’d say he’s playing football.
Hold on. Isn’t there already a game of football?
That’s American football.
Oh.
That’s different.
Soccer.
Football.
Football.
American football.
It’s a baby carriage.
And we’d call it a pram.
Pram? A stroller.
We’d probably call that a buggy or a push chair. What’s in this baby’s mouth?
Oh, a binky or a pacifier.
It’s dummy.
Baby carriage.
Pram.
Stroller.
Pushchair or buggy.
Binky or a pacifier.
Dummy.
What are these signs pointing to?
The restrooms.
And I’d say they’re pointing to the toilets.
Ooh, um, the toilet? A toilet is a toilet. A restroom is a… I don’t know.
Signs to the restrooms.
Signs to the toilets.
Toilet.
Toilet.
The restroom.
The toilet.
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We have other kinds of videos that compare British and American English that you might enjoy. Click here to see more.

One thought on “27 British and American Word Differences

  • November 20, 2019 at 5:56 am
    Permalink

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    Reply

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