Sense verbs – stative and dynamic

Sense Verbs – English Grammar: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

Kathy, my dog has no nose. Really? How does he smell? Terrible! This lesson’s about verbs related to the 5 senses. You’ll learn how sense verbs can have different meanings, and you’ll learn some important grammar too. Let’s start with a conversation. How many sense verbs can you spot? Do you want coffee? Oh yes please. Jay? Hmph. What’s wrong with you today Jay? Nothing? You look tired. I feel fine. You sound angry. Well, I’m not. Here’s your coffee. Ooo thank you Kathy. It smells great. It tastes great too. Where’s mine? You said you didn’t want any. Huh! Did you spot the sense verbs? Let’s check. You look tired. I feel fine. You sound angry. Well, I’m not. Here’s your coffee. Ooo thank you Kathy. It smells great. It tastes great too. Where’s mine? Notice the words that follow the sense verbs here. They’re all adjectives. Now in some languages you could also use an adverb. So for example, you might say “You sound angrily” or “The coffee tastes well”. But not in English. These sentences are wrong. After sense verbs we use adjectives. We can also use the preposition ‘like’ after sense verbs and I’m going to make another video about that, so make sure you subscribe to our channel so you don’t miss it. Now there are a couple more sense verbs that are very common – see and hear. Oh my. What’s the matter with you today. I’m worried about my iphone. Your new iphone? I’ve lost it. Well let me call it. Oh. Can you hear it? Yes, but I can’t see it. It’s in your pocket. Oh. Notice how we used ‘can’ with these verbs. That’s very common because they’re general ability verbs. Hearing and seeing are abilities that people have and we don’t have to make an effort to do them. “They just happen naturally, if our eyes are open and our ears aren’t blocked of course. So we use ‘can’ a lot with ‘see’ and ‘hear’.” I can see you but I can’t hear you. Can you hear me now? Now I can. Now there’s another interesting thing about sense verbs. They all have two or more meanings. And that’s why this old joke works. Kathy, my dog has no nose. Really? How does he smell? Terrible! The joke plays on two different meanings of smell. One meaning is to sense an odour and the other meaning is to give off an odour. Now here’s some grammar you’re going to find very useful as your English gets better. I love this new shampoo Jay. Do you? I don’t. It smells like flowers. Exactly. The verb smell is a stative verb in this sentence because it describes a state – something that just is. But here the verb smell describes an action – we call it a dynamic verb. Stative – Dynamic. So why is this useful, Vicki? Well, we don’t usually use stative verbs in the progressive or continuous form. Even when we’re talking about a temporary situation or state we use the simple form. Understanding stative verbs will help you use simple and progressive forms correctly. “Let’s look at another example.Does my hair look OK Jay? Yeah, it looks fine. You’re not looking. Oh. ” So we’ve got two different meanings of ‘look’. Here it means appear or seem. ‘It looks fine’ means its appearance is fine.” But here look means using your eyes, turning them in a particular direction. And notice the verb forms. With the dynamic verb, we can use the progressive. But with the stative verb, we usually don’t. Taste is similar. We can taste food – so Jay is tasting some soup here. But we can also say something tastes delicious, salty, sweet and so on. So let’s check you’ve understood. Oooo this milk smells funny. When did we buy it? Is ‘smell’ a stative or a dynamic verb here? It’s a stative verb. It’s describing the state of the milk. And what about in this sentence? It’s a dynamic verb. An action. Great! So let’s review. Sense verbs have two or more meanings. When they’re describing an action – something dynamic – we can use the simple or progressive. But when they’re describing a state, we usually use the simple form. Oh, and don’t forget, sense verbs are followed by adjectives, not adverbs. Oh hi Jason. I’m your surgeon. My surgeon? Yes and this is your kidney. My kidney? Yes, thanks for donating it. It looks very healthy.

Superstitions

Superstitious, superstition – English Vocabulary: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

Hi everyone! If you spill salt, do you throw some over your shoulder? This English lesson is about superstitions and it has two parts: first a conversation and then a song with a puzzle. So I’m making a playlist. Enjoy! How’s it going Jay? Terrific! I think I have a big new customer. Really? A big one? Yes, they’re going to order a thousand units. Wow! They’re gonna call me any minute and tell me. Fantastic! This could be my lucky day. Oh that’s so funny. Why? Well, today is Friday the thirteenth. Really? Yes. Some people are superstitious about Friday the thirteenth. They think it’s unlucky. But you’re not superstitious, are you? No… Well maybe… Well, cross your fingers then. Oh no! Oh dear, you’ve spilt the salt. Oh no! Throw some over your shoulders… but keep your fingers crossed. Oh. Is that your phone? Keep your fingers crossed. Did you understand everything? Let’s check. Jay says he has a new customer. But is he sure? How’s it going, Jay? Terrific! I think I have a big new customer. He says ‘I think’, so he’s not sure. He’s waiting for a call from them to see if they place a big order. Wow! They’re gonna call me any minute and tell me. Fantastic! This could be my lucky day. Some people think that when the 13th day of the month falls on a Friday, it’s an unlucky day. It’s a superstition. A superstition is a belief that some events happen in ways that we can’t explain by reason or science. But you’re not superstitious, are you? No… Well maybe… ‘Superstition’ is the noun and ‘superstitious’ is the adjective. We can say people or beliefs are superstitious. “Oh no! Oh dear, you’ve spilt the salt. Oh no!Throw some over your shoulders… but keep your fingers crossed. Oh. Is that your phone? Keep your fingers crossed.” Do you ever cross your fingers or do other things for good luck? And that brings me to your puzzle. It comes in the form of a song about superstitions and it’s sung by the wonderful Stevie Wonder. I’ve made a video in which you’re going to see situations where people often get superstitious and also lots of symbols and objects that are associated with superstitions. How many can you spot? Many come from the US and the UK, but some come from other cultures. So see how many you recognize. And perhaps there are other lucky symbols and interesting superstitions in your culture. Please tell us about them in the comments.

Ways to say you’re happy

Travel, Trip, and Journey – English Vocabulary: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

Look at this. We’ve won a YouTube competition. Really? Yeah. I’m joining the NextUp Class of 2016. That’s amazing! Happiness is a wonderful thing, and in this lesson you’ll learn expressions you can use to say you’re happy. Watch us react to some good news and see how many you can spot. We really won? Yeah, I’m so chuffed. Chuffed? Yeah, I’m tickled pink. Well me too. I’m thrilled. So what’s our prize? I’m going to spend a week at the YouTube studios in New York at a Creator Camp. So we can make Simple English videos there? Yeah, and I get to collaborate with the other winners. How cool is that! I’m over the moon. Me too. I’ll go and pack my bags. No stop. It’s just for me. I can’t come to New York? No. You can stay here and look after the office. Oh, I never win anything. Well, we’ve also won some vouchers to spend on production equipment. Really? Two thousand five hundred dollars. You’re kidding! Microphones, lights, a new camera. How are you feeling now? I couldn’t be happier. So how many expressions did you spot? I’m so chuffed. Chuffed? Yeah, I’m tickled pink. Well me too. I’m thrilled. Chuffed is a British English expression and it means very pleased and delighted. Here are some phrases you’ll hear in British and American English. Notice ‘I’m tickled pink’. The idea here is you’re so happy you glow with pleasure. We might also also say we’re over the moon. Now another expression. How are you feeling now? I couldn’t be happier. This one means you are so happy that it it’s impossible to be any more happy. And now we both have some news. This is real news. We really have won the competition. Every year YouTube holds a NextUp competition for promising channels. There are 36 winners in the US this year, and Simple English Videos is one of them! All kinds of channels entered, so Vicki will be collaborating with some really interesting YouTubers. I can’t wait to meet them. We’re so chuffed! So why did we win? Was it my acting? Ha! Maybe. What do you think? But one reason was channel growth – the number of people who watch our videos. Oh. Then we need to say thank you to all our viewers. Exactly! When you watched a video or clicked the like button, or shared it, or subscribed, you helped us win. Then thank you everyone! We’re over the moon!

Travel, Trip and Journey

Travel, Trip, and Journey – English Vocabulary: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

Kathy! How are you? Fine. We wanted to speak to you about our business trip. You know we’re travelling to California next month? Yes. Can we travel business class? Absoultely not! But it’s a six hour flight. It’s such a long journey. Business class is far too expensive. I think that was a ‘no’. Here are three words my students often muddle up. They have similar meanings. In this video we’ll learn how to use them correctly and fix some common mistakes. Wow! Look at that view. Isn’t that beautiful? Yeah! Let’s go up to the top of that mountain, Jay. That’s a long walk. I think we can travel by cable car. Really? Yeah. Wow! The word ‘travel’ is usually a verb – an action – and it means to go from one place to another. Riding a bike is a great way to travel around the city. I can slip through all the traffic. You know we’re travelling to California next month? Yes. Can we travel business class? Absolutely not. We spell the word ‘traveling’ with one ‘L’ in American English and two ‘Ls’ in British English. And we call people who travel, travellers. In American English we spell that with one ‘L’. And in British English it has two ‘L’s I’m traveling to New York today and then on to Boston. It’s a business trip. ‘Travel’ is normally a verb, but not always. Let’s look at another example. Is ‘travel’ a verb here? My job involves a lot of travel. I’m often away from home. My job involves a lot of travel. I’m often away from home. In this sentence, travel is a noun – a thing. And here’s where it get tricky. If ‘travel’ is a noun, we use it to talk about travel in general. So we might talk about air travel, rail travel, space travel or time travel. The rising price of jet fuel is pushing up the price of air travel for business travelers. When ‘travel’ is a noun, it’s normally uncountable. That means we can’t talk about ‘a’ travel. This is wrong. We use it to talk about travel in general, so this question is wrong too. If you’re talking about a specific piece of travelling, you need to use other words instead, like journey or trip. But it’s a six hour flight. It’s such a long journey. Business class is far too expensive. We use ‘journey’ when places are a long way apart, so there’s a big distance or a lot of time involved. We might talk about a journey acrosss the Sahara, or a journey to outer space. How long does it take you to commute to work, Jay? Two hours. Wow! That’s a long journey! Umm. I guess that’s why you’re always tired when you get to work. Ummm. So a journey involves a long distance or a lot of time. Trips are similar. I’m traveling to New York today and then on to Boston. It’s a business trip. We can take trips for business or trips for pleasure. Tourists in Paris like to take boat trips for fun. When you know someone is going to travel somewhere, you can say, ‘Have a nice trip’. Have a nice trip, Frank. Sure Kitty. See you when I get back. Bon voyage. Now be careful with this word. If it’s a verb, it means something different. If you catch your foot on something and almost fall, you trip. Jay nearly tripped over there. But when trip is a noun, it means a journey to a place and then back again. So how was your trip? It was great. I think we got the contract. Oh well done! And what about your journey? How was that? There were a lot of delays. Trip and journey are both nouns here and they mean slightly different things. Journey refers to the travelling, but trip is the travelling and everything that happens on the way, so the whole visit as well as the journey. So how was your trip? It was great. I think we got the contract. Oh well done! And what about your journey? How was that? There were a lot of delays. So let’s review. There’s travel. It’s normally a verb. We travel from place to place and sometimes it’s a noun – an uncountable noun. When we’re talking about a specific piece of travelling, we use journey and trip. Journeys are often longer than trips. Also journey is just the travelling and trip is the travelling and everything that happens on the way. And that’s it. Now you know how to use these words. Oh hi Kathy! So how was California? Awful! Fantastic! The journey was terrible. The airline lost my luggage. I hate traveling. My journey was wonderful. I got upgraded to first class for free. Oh that’s nice. But what happened in your meetings? Nothing! My trip was a waste of time. I didn’t sell anything. I got three new clients. Oh well done Vicki. What a successful trip! Are you travelling anywhere soon? Have a safe journey and enjoy your trip.

Fit and Suit

Fit and Suit – English Vocabulary: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

You can’t put that there. Yes I can. It doesn’t fit. It does now. We bought Carter a new coat. He’s a very fashionable dog. Does he look good in it? Oh yes, it suits him. The coat fits Carter, and it suits him too, but fit and suit mean different things. In this lesson we’ll learn how to use these verbs. Let’s start with fit. This is the wrong key. It doesn’t fit the lock. I’m hoping this table will fit in that space. Yes. Perfect! If something fits, it’s the correct size and shape. I’ve put on some weight and I can’t close this jacket. It doesn’t fit. What do you think? I like it. Can I help you? Oh, can I try this on? Yes, the fitting room’s over there. When we shop for clothes, we try them on in a fitting room. So what do you think? It fits OK. Yes, it fits, but does it suit me? Clothes that fit you are the correct size and shape. But clothes that suit you are rather different. Does it suit me? Yes, you look very nice in it. If clothes suit someone then the styles and colors make them look attractive. What hat shall I wear? Does this one suit me? Hmmm. Try this one. Now that one suits you. Hey, new hair-do. Oh. Does it suit me? It’s very pink. Yeah. So suit is about looking good. Fit is about being the correct size. We can use both these verbs to talk about schedules. But again, they mean different things. Let’s start with fit. When we have a busy schedule, it can be hard to make space for other things. We need to meet. I could come tomorrow. It’s difficult. I’ve got to go to the bank and we’ve got a marketing meeting. Oh. But I could fit you in after four o’clock. That’d be great. So fitting someone in means making time for them, even though you have a lot of other things to do. In British English we can also use suit to talk about schedules, but the meaning is different. How about 3 o’clock on Friday? Yep – that suits me. Good, that works for me too. Great. In British English, if something suits us, then it’s convenient or acceptable. How about 3 o’clock on Friday? Yep – that suits me. Good, that works for me too. Great. Now one more expression. When people are accepted by other people as part of a group, we can say they fit in. But I don’t think I ever will fit in, not here. I’m different from the guys in this town. Well, as far as that goes Phil, everybody’s different. That’s what makes people interesting. Maybe. So at work, when someone gets along with a team and works well with them, we can say they fit in. So how are the new employees doing? Well, Sally’s great. She’s serious and hard working and she gets on well with everyone. She’s fitting in well. Yes. And what about Jay? Well… There might be a problem? He just doesn’t fit in.

I don’t care – I don’t mind: American and British English

Mind – US and UK Differences: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

Would you like tea, or coffee? I don’t mind. I don’t care. This video’s about a curious difference between British and American English. I’m American. Yes, Jay’s American and I’m British. And this video’s about a family argument. Yes. It’s about the way Jay uses the phrase ‘I don’t care’. No, it’s about how you use the phrase ‘I don’t mind’. Do you want to tell them or shall I? I don’t care. Then let me begin. When you offer us two alternatives, two possibilities, British and American people respond in different ways. Would you like tea, or coffee? I don’t mind. I don’t care. We both mean we’re happy with either alternative, but our responses are different. So same intentions but different responses – that can lead to misunderstandings. Let’s go to the cinema tonight. You mean the movies. There’s that comedy with Sandra Bullock, and that one with Robert De Niro. Which do you fancy? I don’t care. You don’t want to go then? No, I don’t care. All right then. We won’t go. What did I do? In American ‘I don’t care’ means I’m happy with either possibility. You can decide because I like both alternatives. If we say ‘I don’t care’ in British English, it probably means we’re apathetic – we’re not interested. ‘I don’t care’ sounds negative. So what would you like for dinner? Spaghetti or an omelette? Oh I don’t care. I don’t care is often rude in British English. We’d say ‘I don’t mind’. What do you want for dinner? Spaghetti or an omelette? I don’t mind. What? ‘I don’t mind’ makes no sense in American English. It’s the answer to the question ‘Do you mind…?’ like ‘Do you mind if I have the last cookie?'” You can answer ‘No, I don’t mind’, or ‘Actually, I want it’. But if I ask ‘Do you want this or that’ and you answer ‘I don’t mind’ you’re answering a question I didn’t ask, and it drives me crazy. Would you like red wine or white wine? I don’t mind. But which do you want? OK everyone, we’re finished. Now, let’s go and see that movie. You want to see it? Yeah. Great! Now, do you want to walk or take the bus? I don’t mind. Well make up your mind!Why? You can decide.

How to use ‘mind’ in requests

How to use Mind: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

Do you mind if I have the last one? No, take it. Thank you. This video is about the verb ‘mind’. It’s a tricky verb but very useful for making requests. In this video you’ll learn how to use it correctly. Let’s ask someone. Excuse me. Would you mind taking a photo for us? No, not at all. Thank you. ‘Would you mind…?’ is rather a formal phrase and we might use it if we’re asking a stranger to do something for us. Or we might use it if we’re making a big request. OK, I’m off. Oh, are you going past the supermarket? Yes. But I haven’t got much time. We need milk. OK. I can get that. Good. And would you mind getting these things too? This is a long list!Yes, thanks very much. So we often use this phrase when we think we’re imposing – asking someone to help us when it may not be convenient or pleasant for them. Miss Carrington, I know this is going to be a bit unpleasant for you, but would you mind stepping into the next room with me? Aaargh! So what does the word ‘mind’ actually mean in questions like this? ‘Mind’ means dislike or object to something. We’d love it if you could come to stay. But do you mind dogs? Oh that’s good. If we don’t mind something, we don’t object to it. We don’t find it annoying. Listen. What? The neighbours are playing loud rock music again. I don’t mind. We don’t use ‘mind’ in positive sentences. We use it in negative sentences and questions. And something else. Notice how we form the question. If you want to use a verb after ‘mind’ you need to use a gerund – a noun form of the verb. Just add -ing to the verb to make it into a gerund. Another word that often follows mind is ‘if’. These phrases mean much the same thing and we use them to ask if it’s OK to do things. Do you mind if I borrow this? Sure, no problem. Thank you. Um, do you mind if I sit here? Oh no, not at all. Thank you. Use this phrase to ask for permission, to check it’s OK to do something. Now how would you answer these questions? If you want to agree, do you say ‘yes’ or do you say ‘no’? Do you mind if I have the last one? No, take it. Thank you. The answer is ‘no’! Saying no means ‘Yes, it’s OK to do it.’ Excuse me. Would you mind taking a photo for us? No, not at all. Thank you. ‘No’ means ‘I don’t mind, I don’t object.’ No, not at all. So if you want to say yes, you say no! Sometimes English is so confusing! OK, now there’s another expression with mind that you’re going to find useful. Did you post that letter? You mean this letter? Never mind. I’ll post it this afternoon.Never mind is similar to ‘Don’t worry about it’. “So, let’s look at sales. I’m afraid we don’t have this month’s figures yet. Never mind. We can use last month’s. Oh good. Last month’s were better.” I can’t open this jar. Do you want some help? Oh, never mind. I got it. Thanks anyway. Good. So never mind is similar to ‘forget what I just said’. We can use it to take back or withdraw a request. I can’t get reception. Um. Do you mind if I use your phone? No. Oh hang on. Never mind. It’s working. And that’s it! Now you know how to use the verb ‘mind’ in requests. Let’s see how much you can remember? We use ‘mind’ to ask people to do things for us. What’s the correct ending for this sentence? Taking. After ‘mind’ use a gerund. “We also use ‘mind’ to ask for permission to do things. What’s the missing word here? It’s if.” Now if you say ‘Do you mind if I sit here?’ and I say, ‘No, not at all’ am I agreeing to your request, or disagreeing? I’m agreeing. ‘No’ means I don’t mind, I don’t object. Great! OK, let’s finish with a different example. As I said, ‘Would you mind…?’ is a fairly formal phrase. We use it with strangers or to make big requests. If we use it with small requests with people we know well, something else is probably going on. Perhaps we’re being sarcastic because we’re annoyed with someone. “I think it’s an interesting idea. I agree. I think there are possibilities here.What do you think Jay? Jay! What? ” “Would you mind putting your cell phone away?Oh sorry!”

Sports: play, go and do

Sports Verbs – Play – Go – Do: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

What do you want to do this weekend? We could go to the gym and do some weight lifting. Urgh! That’s too energetic. Or we could play some golf. No, let’s go bowling. Bowling? Yeah. But you always win. That’s why I like it. We use these verbs to talk about sports in English. So we do weight lifting. We play golf. And we go bowling. I play golf. In this video you’ll learn which verbs we use with which sports. And you’ll learn the names of lots of sports. Let’s start with the verb ‘play’. In America, we play football. That’s American football, Jay. The rest of the world plays football like this. No, we call that soccer. In British English it’s football. But the ball’s the wrong shape for football. If it’s a sport with a ball, we generally play it. There are exceptions, like we go bowling. But usually we play ball sports. So we play cricket. We play tennis. And we play snooker and pool. We often use ‘play’ where there’s a competition, so someone wins or loses. And of course we can play other games like cards and chess. So we play darts, and we play scrabble. OK, let’s move on to the verb ‘go’. Oooo. What’s the matter? I went jogging this morning and I hurt my back. You poor thing! Notice Jay said ‘went jogging’. ‘Went’ is the past tense of ‘go’ and ‘jogging’ is a gerund – a noun made from a verb by adding ‘-ing’. There are lots of sports that follow this pattern, and they’re generally activities that we don’t do at home. We go out to another place to do them. So we go swimming, we go fishing, we go skiing, we go surfing and we go skateboarding. I’m playing golf tonight. I love golf. What’s your favorite sport, Vicki? Gymnastics. But you don’t do gymnastics. No, I just like watching it on TV. So do I. Our last verb is ‘do’ and we use it with newer more modern sports. We ‘practice’ or ‘do’ them. So we do yoga, do aerobics, do pilates, do judo and do kendo and other martial arts. We also use ‘do’ to talk about specific exercises. So we do squats and we do leg lifts. I do this exercise to build my chest and arm muscles. OK, now it’s your turn. You’re going to see some different sports, games and exercises. Can you say which verb we use with them? Did you get them all? Let’s review. Go horse riding. Play basketball. Do push ups. Go sailing. Play baseball. Go cycling. Do parkour. Play rugby. Go paragliding. Play shuffleboard. Do karate. Go rafting. Go rock climbing. Play volleyball. Go ballooning. Do tai chi. Play rock paper scissors. So are we playing golf or are we going bowling? We’re going bowling. Hmmm. I know. We’ll play rock paper scissors and the winner chooses. So if I win, we’ll play golf. And if I win, we’ll go bowling. Ready? Yeah. Rock, paper, scissors. Ha, ha! Go and find your bowling shoes. Humph.

Due

Wait – Hope _ Expect – Look Forward To: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

Hi Rachel. Hi Rachel. You’re pregnant! Yes, I’m going to have a baby. Oh congratulations! That’s wonderful! Babies are a lot of work. When’s the baby due? Next month. We’re very excited. Get ready for some sleepless nights. Here’s a useful little word that has several different meanings. In this video, you’re going to learn three of them. My baby’s due next month. So use due to say something is expected. It’s useful for talking about arrangements and schedules. Are you coming? Where? We’re due at your mother’s at three. Remember? But the match is due to start. Oh Jay! Jay and I pronounce this word a little differently. Did you notice? Listen again. We’re due at your mother’s at three. Remember? But the match is due to start. Due. Due. Due. Due. Generally speaking, the pronunciation is a little different in American and British English. Due. Due. OK. Let’s look at another meaning of this word. We can use ‘due’ to talk about money that’s owed. Have Patterson’s paid us? No they haven’t. The invoice is due at the end of the month. Don’t worry, they always pay on time. So we use ‘due’ to say when payments are scheduled. And if an invoice or bill needs to be paid immediately, we say it’s due. Can you transfer $10,000 to our checking account? $10,000! Why? The rent, the business loan, the electric bill. They’re all due. OK. So use ‘due’ to talk about scheduled payments. Now money isn’t the only thing we can owe or be owed. I am so tired. Why don’t you take a day off? I’ve used up all my vacation days. Really? I’m due two weeks. You’ve got two weeks coming? Yeah. You lucky thing. I think I’ll go to the beach. If things are owed to us as a right, we can also say they’re due. And it might not be tangible things. For example, we might owe people things like respect and recognition, or credit for doing a good job. Now the final item on the agenda: the sales training course. We’ve had some excellent feedback on this event. It was very well organized. Our thanks are due to Vicki in Philadelphia for organizing it. Thank you very much Craig. Good work Vicki. It looks like you’re due for a promotion. OK everyone. That’s it for this week. See you all next Tuesday. Good, eh? But I organized the sales training course. You told him you did it? So our thanks can be due to people. And people can be due a promotion. We say these things when we think they deserve something as a right. So let’s recap. There’s due in the sense of expected. There’s due in the sense of money that’s due. And there’s due in the sense of something that’s deserved. And if you master these three meanings, you’re due a pat on the back. Come on Vick. What? We’re due at the theater in half an hour. Oh yes. Bye everyone.

For and Since

For and Since: Simple English Videos ESL Lesson

Thank you for calling Pattersons. Your call is very important to us. Please hold. Sorry to keep you waiting. This is Rachel speaking. How can I help you? At last. I’ve been waiting for fifteen minutes. I have a question about…. Oh, I’ve got another call. Can I put you on hold for a moment? Wait! I just have a question about my account. Hello. Hello? We can use both these prepositions to talk about time, so what’s the difference? We use ‘for’ to talk about periods of time. And ‘since’ to talk about points in time. Let’s look at some examples. We’ll start with ‘for’. I think you should throw this sweater away, Jay. But I’ve had it for ten years. Exactly! All right. So she hasn’t written for a couple of weeks. Three weeks. Does that mean anything? Don’t worry so much. I’ve been waiting for fifteen minutes. I have a question about … Oh, I’ve got another call. Can I put you on hold for a moment? Wait! I just have a question about my account. So we use ‘for’ to talk about periods of time. It could be years, weeks, 15 minutes or just a moment. It’s a length of time. Great! Now what about ‘since’? We use since to talk about points in time. At last! Hi everyone. Nice of you to come. What’s the matter. Am I late? We’ve been waiting since two o’clock. But it’s only three. We bought this ball for Carter last Saturday. And since then, he hasn’t stopped playing with it. Oh, he loves it! Last six months, we created more than two hundred thousand jobs each month. That’s the first time that’s happened since 1997. Since two o’clock, since last Saturday, since 1997. They’re all points in time. And another thing. Points in time can be marked by things that happened – by events. And tonight we look back. It’s been ten years since the Wall Street crash. So where are we now? So the Wall Street crash was an event that maked a point in time. Have you heard? Tom’s getting married. When? I don’t know. I haven’t been able to speak to him since I got his email. Give him a call. Oh, right. So again, ‘I got his email’ was an event that marked a point in the past. ‘Since’ is about points in time. May I introduce myself? I’m Watson Pritchard. In just a minute, I’ll show you the only really haunted house in the world. Since it was built a century ago, seven people including my brother, have been murdered in it. Since then, I’ve owned the house. I’ve only spent one night there, and when they found me in the morning, I was almost dead. You’ve been watching this video for several minutes now. We hope that it’s helped you learn when to use ‘for’ and when to use ‘since’. One more example? Oh hi doctor. What’s up? I’m afraid I have some bad news and some very bad news. Oh no! Give me the bad news first. The lab called with your test results. They said you have 24 hours to live. Twenty four hours? That’s terrible! What could be worse? Here’s the very bad news. I’ve been trying to reach you since yesterday. Oooo, you’re still here. Then perhaps you’d like another example. It’s about a young couple called Sue and Larry. They’re in love and they want to get married. Now let’s see. You’ve known each other for…. three months, one week, two days and seventeen hours. And you’re eighteen, Sue? And nineteen, Larry? Have either of you ever been in love before? Well, but not like this. This is the real thing. Yes. So what do you think? Should Sue and Larry get married. Why, ever since I first met Larry, I haven’t wanted to date anyone else. The whole three months now. Is that a good enough reason? Write to us in the comments and tell us what you think. Bye now!