Raise and Rise – Transitive and Intransitive verbs

Raise and rise – these verbs have similar meanings. Learn how we use these transitive and intransitive verbs differently.
Raise is a regular verb and rise is irregular (rise, rose, risen). And importantly, raise is transitive and rise is intransitive. That means raise has a direct object. We always raise something. Rise, on the other hand, has no direct object. You can’t rise something. See lots of examples and learn how to use these verbs in this video.
You’ll also learn a British and American difference: pay rise and pay raise.


Learn more about transitive and intransitive verbs.  Click here for a video on the verbs grow and grow up and click here for a video on the verbs lie and lay.

Raise Rise Video Script

And now ladies and gentlemen, Vicki will rise into the air. She’s rising. She’s risen. She rose.
Oooh. What happened?
I used my magic powers to raise you into the air.
What else can you do with that?
Oh anything. I can even make you disappear.

Both of these verbs describe upward movement, but they mean slightly different things and we use them in different ways. In this video you’ll learn how to use them correctly.
Raised is a regular verb – raise – raised – raised. When we raise something we lift it or move it to a higher position.

Raise your arm.
OK.
Raise your other arm.
OK.
Raise your leg.
Like this?
Yes, now raise your other leg.
But that’s impossible.
Try.
Ooo! This is amazing!

So what kinds of things do we raise? We might raise our hand when we have a question and when we’re surprised we might raise our eyebrows. We can also raise our glasses. So raise means move to a higher level – and it could be a higher level of importance.

And in technology news the government is launching a campaign to raise awareness of internet security.

If we raise awareness we bring something to people’s attention. At a meeting we might raise a question. Or we might raise concerns – bring up our concerns so they get attention. Another thing we raise is children – we bring them up, care for them, parent them. Great, now let’s look at rise.

She’s rising. She’s risen. She rose.
Oooh.

Rise is an irregular verb. Rise – rose – risen – and it means go up – increase in level. Temperatures rise. Pressure rises. When we fill balloons with hot air, they rise into the air. So here’s the big question. How are ‘raise’ and ‘rise’ different?

Apple won its law suit against Samsung in the United States. As a result Samsung may raise the price of its Galaxy phones and tablets.
The price of gas has risen by 10 cents in the last month. Oil companies are blaming bad weather in the Gulf of Mexico.

Companies raise prices. Companies increase them. Prices rise. They go up on their own. Raising is putting up, but rising is going up. The sun rises in the east. Nobody puts it up. It goes up on its own.
Raise is transitive verb so it has a direct object. We always raise something. Rise is an intransitive verb, so it has no direct object. You can’t rise something. Things rise or rise up or rise into the air but they don’t rise something.
Now maybe you’re thinking hey Vicki, into the air? Isn’t air an object? Good question. But it’s not a direct object. Look there’s a preposition there.
Let’s look at another example. When we make bread and we put it in the oven, does it raise or does it rise? It rises. Nobody puts it up – it goes up on its own.
So if you’re not sure which verb to use, here’s a handy way to think of it. Rise is like go up. But raise is like lift up or put up.
Raise and rise are verbs but they can also be nouns. They both mean an increase in pay or salary, but there’s a little difference between British and American English. See if you can spot how we use them differently.

Hey, I’ve got some good news. They’re increasing my salary.
Uhuh.
I’m getting a raise this month.
Yes, we all are.
You’re getting one too?
Yes, I always get a pay rise in September.
Did you spot it? Jay’s American and I’m British. Jay said ‘raise’ and I said ‘rise’. Watch again.
I’m getting a raise this month.
Yes, we all are.
Oh, you’re getting one too?
Yes, I always get a pay rise in September.
I’m getting 3%.
Oh.
What are you getting?
5%.
Oh.

And that’s it! So now you know how to use raise and rise in English. Let’s finish with another magic trick. But first, don’t forget to subscribe to our channel so you catch our next video.

And older version of this video is available with a clickable transcript. Click here to see it.
Learn more about transitive and intransitive verbs.  Click here for a video on the verbs grow and grow up and click here for a video on the verbs lie and lay.
Click here to see more vocabulary videos.

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